60V DC battery switch

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Unrealeous

New member
Joined
Jan 10, 2020
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8
Hi

I'm building a 16s LiFeSo4 battery system so looking for a battery switch that can handle ~60V or greater.

There are a myriad of battery switches that are rated to 48V, and I've seen many a photo of people using these on similar systems.

However, has anyone come across a higher voltage battery switch.

Thanks.
 

Oberfail

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Joined
Jun 22, 2021
Messages
64
There is pretty much next to no difference between 48v & 60v when it comes to switches. 12 volts more aren't gonna kill a simple switch.
You want one tho, that fits the amount of amps you are going to draw from the battery.
 

Unrealeous

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Jan 10, 2020
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Thanks for the replies.
And to be honest I'll have a protective relay on the circuit as well so I'm not too fused about using a 48V one.
 

cak

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Mar 14, 2021
Messages
65
The main concern with higher voltage on the switch is if there is not large enough gaps or insulation it can be dangerous. Also if it is turned off under load there can be an arc which it is not designed for. If your load is under 100amps I would recommend using a midnite solar DC breaker as your switch then you also get the safety functions and it is rated 150v and up to 100amp continues for only about $20ea. Lower amp values are also available. https://www.altestore.com/store/enc...lar-100amp-150vdc-panel-mount-breaker-p10214/
 

Korishan

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Jan 7, 2017
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6,552
Agree with the above. The switch needs to be able to disconnect under load without failing. You would want to have a switch that can do at least 10-20% over your max voltage, and 20% amp rating higher than your max load. This is so that if you have to disconnect under load, the switch will be able to handle the arc that is created during the disconnect.
AC switches can not be used for DC loads unless specifically stated on the switch. The reason is because AC changes direction, it self extinguishes. Whereas a DC does not. It will create a plasma path and continue to burn as long as there is sufficient amps/volts to jump the gap.
Since you stated 60V, then you want one that can handle higher than 70V at least.

I'll have a protective relay on the circuit
Can you clarify this statement please? What relay are you using?

We just don't want something to get welded closed and cause a fire, so we're just looking out for you ;)
 

Unrealeous

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Jan 10, 2020
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8
I'm currently considering either of the following


both of which are certified for use in Australian installations.
 

Korishan

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Jan 7, 2017
Messages
6,552
Either of those should work just fine. The voltage is way clear of what you would be passing through it, which is a good thing.
Just make sure that the Amps you'll be needing will be 80% of the rated breaker.

As far as the switch goes, you'll want something similar as far as the numbers go. If you only plan on turning the system off/on rarely, you can use the breaker as the switch. But if you plan on flipping it often, then you don't want to use the breaker for that option.

Another switch you could look at is a "contactor". Those are designed for triggering on/off many times without failing. You can get manual contactors, or get ones with an energizing coil that will remotely flip the switch (say a trigger from the BMS alert for instance)
 
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