avoid injecting into the grid

copec

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Apr 22, 2020
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Cheap4-life said:
There is grid tie inverters out there (more than one) that allow the user to avoid talking to the utility at all. Zero export, limiting etc. This imo is a better option financially. User can then save all the excess power they want to that their solar produces by increasing the size of their battery bank. Batteries are becoming cheaper. Exporting power to the utility to buy back later can lead to minimal savings. In my area and many areas of the USA, the electric companies say a home owner can not touch any part of the renewable install. For me that meant $26000 to have the size setup that I installed myself for $7000. I wouldnt spend 26k for electricity in a lifetime. So I ignored them because in the end my money is more important than their rules.

I am of exactly like mind. I priced out a system I could install myself for ~$10k with batteries and basically exist fine in terms of power if there were an apocalypse and grid power stopped working all together. The equivalent net-metering contractor installed system priced out at ~$90k, and would be dependent on the grid.


Wolf said:
As far as permission from your utility is concerned here is legon solars answers. Kind of a different take.
https://legionsolar.com/faq.html

Wolf

This looks awesome. I've now referenced this company to everyone who has asked me if they could do solar themselves too.
 

copec

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Another option is to install an approved grid-tie system, and then connect inside your house to something like this: https://www.sigineer.com/product/18...-inverter-charger-120v-240v-110v-220v-230vac/

One could even get one of those Inverters and a battery as a manually connected backup power. Turn off the mains and plug it in through a drier plug, and it would couple with the grid-tie inverter. Don't even have to modify the house.
 
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floydR

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cheap 4-life I think by using the low frequency inverter such as the sigineer split phase he suggests back feeding though the dryer outlet with main breaker turned off you would be creating a micro grid allowing the gtil to operate. but I could be wrong.
 

Cheap 4-life

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I have heard mixed reviews about that. Most of them not good. Could damage some equipment trying to do it. I’d just use an offgrid inverter when the grids down.
 

copec

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I have heard mixed reviews about that. Most of them not good. Could damage some equipment trying to do it. I’d just use an offgrid inverter when the grids down.
Yeah, sorry to be confusing. At least in my GTILs it is easy to shut off the limiter function in the menu. So I was throwing out some arbitrary thoughts that I probably shouldn't have, because off-topic.
 

Fluffy78

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Apr 12, 2021
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You will need a charge controller and a battery with the Victron MultiPlus II and the GX model has the VE.Can build in (USB, Ethernet and VE.Direct for communication with other Victron devices) - I have been looking at this inverter myself and I think it seems very nice, I just can't find any information on how to use it with a selv-build batterypack.

Hi,

Have you been able to find anything about connecting the Victron to a self built battery? I'm thinking about doing the same actually and am looking for a french legal inverter to which I can connect my own battery.

I see Victron support exclusively a small set of batteries with BMS, but I haven't been able to find out if their BMS can connect to a non Victron battery.

thanks,

Cedric
 
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