eBAy batteries

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SteveMosher

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Nov 1, 2016
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11
I see,

My goal is to at least get my house thru the night without using any city power. My home burns high at night at 1700w. Im trying to figure out if 2 of these batteries and the inverter would fit the bill.

Im a complete NEWB so in advance I apologize
 

SteveMosher

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Joined
Nov 1, 2016
Messages
11
Ok I think Im getting it now.

Im going up this week to pick up 6 of these batteries.

If I got my math in order that would be 55.6V - 53Ah - 3000Wh 55.6v 53Ah 18000Wh ? Or would the Ah also go up x6?
 

SteveMosher

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Nov 1, 2016
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11
I knew I was to new for this stuff. I sorry for asking dumb questions. Sorry to trouble you guys.
 

Chipper6

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Nov 12, 2016
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SteveMosher said:
Ok I think Im getting it now.

Im going up this week to pick up 6 of these batteries.

If I got my math in order that would be 55.6V - 53Ah - 3000Wh 55.6v 53Ah 18000Wh ? Or would the Ah also go up x6?

Your 18000Whr math is correct (it includes 6x the Ah rating) since you will be connecting those 6 packs together in parallel, your total pack will be 55.6V X 318Ah (53x6) = ~18000Whr

That means, with a full battery pack and your prescribed load you can go 18000 Whr / 1700W = ~ 10.5 hrs

Now, based on how much solar you have, you may or may not be able to run your house during the day + fully charge the battery pack to run through the next night.... But that's the great thing about building it yourself, you just keep building...
 

SteveMosher

New member
Joined
Nov 1, 2016
Messages
11
Chipper6 said:
SteveMosher said:
Ok I think Im getting it now.

Im going up this week to pick up 6 of these batteries.

If I got my math in order that would be 55.6V - 53Ah - 3000Wh 55.6v 53Ah 18000Wh ? Or would the Ah also go up x6?

Your 18000Whr math is correct (it includes 6x the Ah rating) since you will be connecting those 6 packs together in parallel, your total pack will be 55.6V X 318Ah (53x6) = ~18000Whr

That means, with a full battery pack and your prescribed load you can go 18000 Whr / 1700W = ~ 10.5 hrs

Now, based on how much solar you have, you may or may not be able to run your house during the day + fully charge the battery pack to run through the next night.... But that's the great thing about building it yourself, you just keep building...

Thank you.

The solar on the roof 31 Solarworld panels with enPhase 250Wh micro inverters.
 

SteveMosher

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Nov 1, 2016
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11
Solar picture

image_iehpyh.jpg
 

Chipper6

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Nov 12, 2016
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8
OK. So for an example... using your 7 day average (147kW-hr / 7 days ) = 21 kW-hrs of solar produced per day (given it's November, this might be close to your annual average in California?)

If we assume your 1700W load is an all day average, that means you burn (1700W x 24 hrs) = 40.8kW-hrs (if your solar app doesn't give you your household daily usage, hop on PG&E's website, they give you pretty good numbers down to the hour). So, you have 40.8 - 21 = 19.8kWhrs that you are pulling from the grid each day.

If you really are using 40.8kW-hrs a day, and you want a battery system to help you get through the night, then you need more solar supply or cut back on your usage. If you want to not pull energy from the grid, then you need to match your daily usage with your daily solar supply, then you can store the excess solar power during the day and use it at night.

To stretch this thought experiment into two scenarios. One where you reduce your consumption, lets keep the 21kw-hr a day average. If you produce this energy over the span of 8 hours, then you'll be on battery for 16 hours (or 2/3rds of the day. 21kW-hr x 2/3rds = 14kW-hr . This means that your 18kW-hr battery pack will probably be ok unless you have a bad solar day then you may start pulling from the grid in the morning.

The other scenario is you can't reduce your consumption and you burn ~ 40kW-hrs a day. That means for 2/3rds of the day you'll need ~26.7 Kw-hr's of battery to get through the night, but you'll also need a solar array that is averaging 40kW-hrs of production / day.

Hope this helps.
 

SteveMosher

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Nov 1, 2016
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11
AWSOME! Thank you dude!

Being Nov the production in fact is not as high as per say June or July. We have replaced all the lights in the house to LEDs now. We just ditched my sons plasma TV he had in his room and ran with an LED TV there. That thing was a pig!

Im here in Modesto and out not on PG&Es lines. WE have our own local MID here. I will contact them today and see what sort of online tool they have to see exactly what we are doing here.

One last question -- Can I get away with 1 4000W inverter or should I at least double that up?

Chipper6 said:
OK. So for an example... using your 7 day average (147kW-hr / 7 days ) = 21 kW-hrs of solar produced per day (given it's November, this might be close to your annual average in California?)

If we assume your 1700W load is an all day average, that means you burn (1700W x 24 hrs) = 40.8kW-hrs (if your solar app doesn't give you your household daily usage, hop on PG&E's website, they give you pretty good numbers down to the hour). So, you have 40.8 - 21 = 19.8kWhrs that you are pulling from the grid each day.

If you really are using 40.8kW-hrs a day, and you want a battery system to help you get through the night, then you need more solar supply or cut back on your usage. If you want to not pull energy from the grid, then you need to match your daily usage with your daily solar supply, then you can store the excess solar power during the day and use it at night.

To stretch this thought experiment into two scenarios. One where you reduce your consumption, lets keep the 21kw-hr a day average. If you produce this energy over the span of 8 hours, then you'll be on battery for 16 hours (or 2/3rds of the day. 21kW-hr x 2/3rds = 14kW-hr . This means that your 18kW-hr battery pack will probably be ok unless you have a bad solar day then you may start pulling from the grid in the morning.

The other scenario is you can't reduce your consumption and you burn ~ 40kW-hrs a day. That means for 2/3rds of the day you'll need ~26.7 Kw-hr's of battery to get through the night, but you'll also need a solar array that is averaging 40kW-hrs of production / day.

Hope this helps.
 

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Chipper6

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Nov 12, 2016
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If you can get a history from your power company that will help sizing your battery. Our power consumption also varies with the season, especially if you have central Air Conditioning.

For the inverter sizing, you have to do two things. Find the biggest power draw in your house, and make sure it is less than or equal to the "Continuous"duty of the inverter. For me, this is my electric dryer at 5.6kW. Soon it will be an EV that has a 7kW charger. My dad made his woodshop off the grid, and he designed his circuits around the different power tools. You should go around the house with a note pad and read each label for its rated current/Power. The big ones for a normal house: Electric dryer, electric AC, and air or water Heaters. Then you need to think, "Will I ever run more than one of these at the same time?". For over kill, You can also just go to your circuit breaker panel. If you size the inverter to handle every circuit breaker you have, then you'll be covered.
 

SteveMosher

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Nov 1, 2016
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11
dude I cannot thank you enough.

It seems I am on the right path. again thank you!

Im very new to this
 
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