Jeep battery/DC to DC converter


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prepared1

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Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
78
Has anyone bought any of the Jeep packs from Battery Hookup? The pack has a battery, and a dc to dc converter. Has anyone figured out how to make the converter work?
 

floydR

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Joined
Aug 23, 2017
Messages
1,466
Saw this and I believe it is the same battery and dc to dc converter.
Ben's Solar and Battery Ben McFeeters he wasn't able to figure it out. :( prehaps if you know Can Bus you can.

Later floyd
 

prepared1

Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
78
FloydR: Kind of a goofy video. Let me see, if I stick this in here, it didn't blow up, uh lets try to blow it up over here....

Of course, he didn't actually say that. Sort of....

From what I read on Jeep sites, that pack was used under a seat to power up a lighter style A/C outlet for accessories you might want to run off the battery. It wasn't really clear if it was the exact same model or not. But they are tied into other computers in the car, so it is unlikely you would be able to just turn on the DC to DC unit. Too bad, because it might be nice for things like a golf cart conversion. I'm not into selling on Ebay, so that is out.

It is a cool pack to play with, and there might be value in some of the other components. In a somewhat similar vein, I regret not buying some of those aluminum Mercedes modules they had last year. They also had a DC to DC unit. But those were about 900 watts.

I know nothing about Canbus, but wish I did for my large rack project.
 

jgilly69

New member
Joined
Aug 11, 2019
Messages
17
Sorry this is long --- These are from RAM Etorque systems.... Here is how they work -

DESCRIPTION The Battery Pack Control Module (BPCM) is one of the Battery Management System (BMS) components on 48 volt e-Torque equipped vehicles. The BPCM is integral to and serviced with the Power Pack Unit (PPU) (1). The BPCM is the network node for the PPU. The BPCM communicates on and manages the Controller Area Network-electrified Powertrain (CAN-ePT) data network. The CAN-ePT is a private bus network used only in the e-Torque system with e-Torque components. For further information on the e-Torque system, (Refer to 08 - Electrical/eTorque System/Description) .

OPERATION The BMS has five major functions:
Component Protection - There are several layers to Component Protection of the BMS: Power Limiting - The power limits are for both charging the battery system and discharging the battery system. The Hybrid Control Processor (HCP) will not exceed the power limits that are managed by the BPCM. The BPCM power limiting is a function of temperature, state-of-charge, current, and usage.
Cell Balancing - There are 12 cells in the 48 volt battery system. Cell balancing is used to minimize cell voltage and capacity variation due to parameters such as temperature imbalance and manufacturing variance. The BPCM will report out if balancing is complete and if it is in balance mode. The HCP does have the ability to override or initiate cell balancing.
Over/Under Voltage and Temperature Protection - The BPCM transmits threshold and maximum/minimum allowable values for cell voltage and temperature for which, if exceeded in a calibrated time, the BPCM opens the contacts.
Contact Control - The contacts are physically controlled by the BPCM. The BPCM opens contacts when component protection limits are being violated. The contacts are opened after a calibrated amount of time after a CAN-ePT signal is transmitted by the BPCM. If the conditions causing the threshold violation are no longer present during this time, the opening of the contacts can be avoided. During this time, the HCP can proceed to opening the contacts by sending a CAN-ePT signal that allows the contacts to open if needed. The BMS uses four signals to manage the contact in the 48 volt battery system:
COMMAND - A command signal used by the HCP to functionally control the state of the contacts. These contacts are physically controlled by the BPCM.
REQUEST - A request to communicate signal is utilized by the BPCM when the BPCM has detected a failure which could either impede normal BPCM control of the contacts or cause severe damage to the contacts.
OPEN - An OPEN signal used by the BPCM to communicate when the contact will open due to a detected failure where there is no chance for recovery.
STATUS - A signal used by the BPCM that represents the physical state of the contact at the time of signal transmission. Report 48 volt Battery System Status - The BPCM reports the status of the 48 volt battery system. This includes: Minimum/Maximum/Average cell voltages at open circuit and under load and cell identification number - The BPCM measures the voltage of every cell and reports the cell minimum, maximum, and average voltages over the CAN-ePT bus network. During BPCM wakeup, the BPCM will determine the unloaded open circuit voltage for the minimum, maximum, and average cell voltages and transmit that information over CAN-ePT. The cell locations for the minimum and maximum cell voltages will be communicated over the CAN-ePT. Voltage validity is determined by when a calibrated amount of cell voltage sensors are failed and the service disconnect is present, the BPCM will set a the cell voltage validity to INVALID. Minimum/Maximum/Average cell temperatures and cell identification number - The BPCM will measure the 48 volt battery system temperatures in the battery module. There is one module and it consists of a set of cells in series. The minimum, maximum, and average cell temperatures and the corresponding cell locations will be reported over the CAN-ePT bus network. Temperature validity is determined when a calibrated amount of failed temperature sensors are detected. Once detected, the BPCM will set the corresponding battery module temperature validity to INVALID. When the 48 volt battery module minimum temperature validity is equal to INVALID, the BPCM 48 volt battery pack minimum module temperature will be set to its smallest possible value. When the 48 volt battery module maximum temperature validity is equal to INVALID, the BPCM 48 volt battery pack max module temperature will be set to its largest possible value.

Battery system voltage and current - BPCM functionality includes measuring battery current and battery voltage during charge and discharge. The BPCM measures the 48 volt battery system voltage before the main contacts on the battery side at a minimum of 20ms. Battery State of Charge (SoC) - The BPCM determines the 48 volt battery SoC defined as the remaining charge in the battery divided by the battery rated capacity. SoC is expressed as 100% denoting full charge and 0% defining a depleted battery. The SoC algorithm often includes variables such as temperature, battery age, duty profile (power versus time, aggressive versus non-aggressive), rest time, and partial recharge. Inlet/Outlet battery temperatures - The BPCM monitors and reports the 48 volt battery system temperatures of the inlet and outlet temperature and any other temperatures that need to be measured to implement the thermal management algorithms. Battery State of Health (SoH) - capacity and resistance - The BPCM reports the 48 volt battery system SoH based on the rise in calculated internal resistance and decrease in capacity. Battery end of life is generally defined as a 20% decrease in the 48 volt battery system capacity or 25% power degradation. Battery conditioning and state of over-voltage or under-voltage - A CAN-ePT signal is sent from the BPCM indicating to the vehicle whether or not the 48 volt battery is ready to accept or receive power. If the signal is set to 0, this will indicate that the 48 volt battery is not ready due to extremely hot or cold battery temperatures and/or high or low cell voltages. The contacts will close to allow a small amount of power to heat or cool the battery, or raise or lower the voltage. If condition are correct, the BPCM will open the contacts to protect the 48 volt battery system.

Diagnostics - The BPCM is a dependent controller and reports out the diagnostics to the HCP over the CAN-ePT bus network. State Determination - The state determination refers to the following: Power up and power down - Power Up - The BPCM only wakes up with the IGN RUN/START hardwire signal. Once woken, the BPCM initializes the CAN-ePT bus and begins transmitting its own messages to the other components on the network to begin and maintain the e-Torque operation.
Power Down - The BPCM power down process begins once the BPCM determines the loss of the IGN-RUN/START wake-up input as well as receiving a shutdown command from the HCP. Once these two conditions are met, the BPCM stops the CAN-ePT network and initiates its power down actions.
BPCM initialization - The BPCM initialization process occurs when the BPCM receives the wake-up signal. During this process, the BPCM uses its internal logic to start the CAN-ePT bus to help manage and maintain the BMS.
Fan Control - The BPCM determines the fan speed based off of signal inputs for the cell temperature sensors, Direct Current (DC/DC) temperature sensors, vehicle speed and engine Revolutions Per Minute (RPM). The BPCM uses these CAN signal values to achieve the proper thermal management of the 48 volt battery system. The BPCM also performs diagnostics for the thermal management performance and reports and malfunctions to the vehicle system. The engine compartment PDC provides the BPCM with a 300 amp fuse protected battery power (B+) circuit and an IGN RUN/START relay signal. The interior PDC provides the BPCM with a low temperature passive pump supply circuit and a 10 amp fuse protected 12 volt B+ circuit. The BPCM receives 12 volts ground at the C1 and a 48 volt ground at the C4 wire harness connectors. Refer to the wiring diagrams for further information.
 
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