Lithium ion Battery in satellites ? I want to know about space batteries ?

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Jan 25, 2018
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I read about saft a company by Total which supplies batteries for space sector... like f-35,iridium next , and other satellites . Can Any one explain about in detail ??
they are lithium ion batteries ?.. even space sector is acquiring this technology. I want to enrich my knowledge in space batteries.
 

completelycharged

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Wonder if the name means everything in relation to the question....... ViralPrankster
 

completelycharged

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I was trying to read the introduction and guess chapter 1, the covers are a poor impression of the contents.

Blind people see the world better than most.
 

ajw22

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You might also find "atomic battery" interesting, which are essential for deep space missions.
Basically a small nuclear fission reactor, but without the chainreaction and the associated big boom potential.
 

OhmGrown

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Well shit, I was gonna make a doomsday robot for my next project but now that I've read this, looks like I'll be making a low orbit satellite. How many cells do you think I'd need to fire a laser that can at least take out my neighbor Ron's house?
 

completelycharged

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Low earth orbit would give you around 3 minutes at a high angle once every few days or closer to once a week if minimal atmospheric absorbtion is needed. This would then provide a good average of around 14 hours per day of charge time between targets or approx 100 hours of solar charge time.

With 1kW of panels that gives you about 100kWh (making the math easier).

For a laser you would need a whole lot more capacity in the form of supercaps, closer to about 20kW.

If you can shorten the pulse duration down (without vapourising the satellite in the process) to about 1uS then the pulse energy would be around 72TW.

Say efficiency of the whole setup is quite poor at only 5% then you end up with 3.6TW

Taking into account the odd insect absorbing a few MW turning into a ball of plasma and a bird, which could end up a quite spectacular plasma explosion and zap quite a few MW of output...

I think this could take some of the roof off but the 100kWh pack would have to be capable of discharging within 3 minutes with a discharge rate of 2MW to allow for 5 shots...

Fit it all into a Tesla Roadster, launch it and sit a starman in it, post it all over the internet, nobody is any wiser.


AHHHHHH forget all that. I want one of these scaled to about 1kg in size....

https://www.electronicsweekly.com/n...cube-nuclear-battery-lasts-100-years-2018-05/


Ah, bad math.... instead of 1kg it would need to be a 151kg nuclear "battery" to provide a constant 570W output for my house, although I could then probably replace the lights with small batteries as they should glow 24hr a day and therefore reduce my load requirement..
 

OhmGrown

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completelycharged said:
Low earth orbit would give you around 3 minutes at a high angle once every few days or closer to once a week if minimal atmospheric absorbtion is needed. This would then provide a good average of around 14 hours per day of charge time between targets or approx 100 hours of solar charge time.

With 1kW of panels that gives you about 100kWh (making the math easier).

For a laser you would need a whole lot more capacity in the form of supercaps, closer to about 20kW.

If you can shorten the pulse duration down (without vapourising the satellite in the process) to about 1uS then the pulse energy would be around 72TW.

Say efficiency of the whole setup is quite poor at only 5% then you end up with 3.6TW

Taking into account the odd insect absorbing a few MW turning into a ball of plasma and a bird, which could end up a quite spectacular plasma explosion and zap quite a few MW of output...

I think this could take some of the roof off but the 100kWh pack would have to be capable of discharging within 3 minutes with a discharge rate of 2MW to allow for 5 shots...

Fit it all into a Tesla Roadster, launch it and sit a starman in it, post it all over the internet, nobody is any wiser.

Jesus Christ that was thorough! I shoulda known someone would actually have the breakdown to make a doomsday laser here
 

Geek

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The New Horizons probe was powered by Plutonium. Source. Not exactly on topic - but interesting trivia.
 
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