Samsung ICR18650-22F Cell Specifications


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TheBatteries

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Warning: The information in this thread was obtained from various sources on the Internet, including any datasheets linked below, and is provided for reference only. It is not guaranteed to be accurate. To prevent fire or personal injury, never charge or discharge a cell before verifying the information yourself using the original specifications sheet provided by the manufacturer.

Brand:Samsung
Model:ICR18650-22F
Capacity:2200mAh Rated
Voltage:3.60V Nominal
Charging:4.20V Maximum
1100mA Standard
2200mA Maximum
Discharging:2.75V Cutoff
440mA Standard
4400mA Maximum
Description:Green Cell Wrapper
White Insulator Ring
18650 Form Factor


Data References:
http://www.tme.eu/de/Document/71b610093f14a53a8417944008628183/ICR18650-22F.pdf

Pictures:

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ewasu

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Jun 27, 2019
Messages
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Dear Friend
I removed my Toshiba laptop battery for replace due expiring of battery. But the matter is above battery difficult to findin the market now.
Pls let me know any compatible battery type by Panasonic and LG for Samsung ICR18650 22f.[diy]undefined[/diy]
 

emmsee

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Jun 18, 2017
Messages
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These cells are commonly found in Aldi Infinty 20 V Drill Batteries - 5S2P
I have recovered 70 from new batteries and Capacity/Resistance tested them 3 times with the Lii500.
Average Capacity tested from4.1 volts - 3 volts - 4.1 volts x 3= 2144 Mah
Average Internal Resistance =54 mOhms
Average final voltage = 4.12 V

These are going into a4S16P battery for 5050 LED strings and security camera.

Hope this helps someone.
cheers
emmsee :D
 

tremors

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Jul 6, 2017
Messages
57
standard discharge 2200mA, not "440mA Standard"
 

scottmx

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Sep 15, 2022
Messages
2
These cells are commonly found in Aldi Infinty 20 V Drill Batteries - 5S2P
I have recovered 70 from new batteries and Capacity/Resistance tested them 3 times with the Lii500.
Average Capacity tested from4.1 volts - 3 volts - 4.1 volts x 3= 2144 Mah
Average Internal Resistance =54 mOhms
Average final voltage = 4.12 V

These are going into a4S16P battery for 5050 LED strings and security camera.

Hope this helps someone.
cheers
emmsee :D
Hi I'm just starting out gathering batteries to make a power wall or something along those lines, can you mix different types of 18650 cells??
 

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Oberfail

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Jun 22, 2021
Messages
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Hi I'm just starting out gathering batteries to make a power wall or something along those lines, can you mix different types of 18650 cells??
Yes you can mix different types and for low-quality packs its perfectly fine. However its not ideal and you'll encounter various issues.

Not every 18650 is the same, they have various discharge curves and just matching mAh will result in a badly matched pack. You'd want to match the mWh of each cell in your used voltage range, but such testers are expensive, so most go for mAh matched instead. But that will loose you roughly 5% useable capacity.

Here you can compare two cells with each other: https://lygte-info.dk/review/batteries2012/Common18650comparator.php

You must also keep the weakest link of the chain in mind. If you build a pack with 1x 500mA discharge and 9x 1000mA discharge cells in parallel, your maximum current should be limited to the weakest cell * the amount of cells in parallel.

Also, dont forget to use a BMS with atleast a weak Balancer, or else you'll risk ruining your batteries by overdischarging them or possibly starting a fire by overcharging them.
 

scottmx

New member
Joined
Sep 15, 2022
Messages
2
Yes you can mix different types and for low-quality packs its perfectly fine. However its not ideal and you'll encounter various issues.

Not every 18650 is the same, they have various discharge curves and just matching mAh will result in a badly matched pack. You'd want to match the mWh of each cell in your used voltage range, but such testers are expensive, so most go for mAh matched instead. But that will loose you roughly 5% useable capacity.

Here you can compare two cells with each other: https://lygte-info.dk/review/batteries2012/Common18650comparator.php

You must also keep the weakest link of the chain in mind. If you build a pack with 1x 500mA discharge and 9x 1000mA discharge cells in parallel, your maximum current should be limited to the weakest cell * the amount of cells in parallel.

Also, dont forget to use a BMS with atleast a weak Balancer, or else you'll risk ruining your batteries by overdischarging them or possibly starting a fire by overcharging them.
Thanks for info, I've got an opus Bt-c3100 charger/tester still finding my way in how to use it.
I have been charging all the batteries first and leaving them for a week to see which ones loose the most voltage, maybe not very scientific, but thought it was the best approach to start with..
 

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