Wind generators that are not complete junk?

Crimp Daddy

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Feb 21, 2018
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Looking to learn about and buy my first wind generator. I want to start with something that isnt complete junk and was hoping to get a little direction.

Also, what does thetypically equipment chain look like? Can I still use a MPPT solar charge controller like the Victron after the rectifier or is that not recommended?
 

OffGridInTheCity

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Midnite Solar Classic charge controllers have specific MPPT support for wind (and hydro) power inputs. From youtubes it seems like wind has a challenging / variable power-input curve.

I must say, I keep wishing to experiment BUT there are many negatives and in my location in a low wind and dense neighborhood it would have to be very-high (very-visible) and neighbors would probably call the city. Sigh....
 

Korishan

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Depending on your location, you will need to choose a HAWT or a VAWT.
A HAWT (Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine) is best suited for turbulent, low speed winds. But they don't produce as much as the VAWT's.
A VAWT (Vertical Axial Wind Turbine) are best suited for large open flat lands with little or no obstructions. They need straight moving air.

A HAWT (Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine) are best suited for large open flat lands with little or no obstructions. They need straight moving air.
A VAWT (Vertical Axial Wind Turbine) is best suited for turbulent, low speed winds. But they don't produce as much as the VAWT's.

Downside to a HAWT is that they produce less power. Upside is they can be placed in many locations at lower heights. They also can handle higher winds (like storm gusts) as there is no swinging back and forth. They are easier to lock in place, too.
Downside to a VAWT is that need height, the higher the better, and they need lots of space to keep the air from being turbulent. High speed winds are their enemy. You would need to get one with a very good locking mechanism to keep the blades from spinning in stormy weather.

As far as charge controllers go, you need a controller that is designed for wind turbines as they have a dump load connection. This is for when the batteries are full, the power generated can be offloaded somewhere. Turbines (both wind and hydro) need a dump load. They will burn themselves up if they don't have a dump load.
 

OffGridInTheCity

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Here's a youtube channgle @MissouriWindandSolar that can be interesting. Has home made controllers, one combined with Midnite Classic "Missouri Wind and Solar ALL IN ONE CLASSIC MPPT BOARD FOR WIND TURBINES" -https://youtu.be/mSwh4cdc_Xc

But if you look thru, many of the ideas of wind power and controllers are covered here and there. I've found it instructive in this area.
 

Crimp Daddy

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Korishan, based off what you said, 100% HAWT would be best for my application.

I am just looking to supplement my solar with a little wind at this point. I have even considered making my own using a brushless RC motor but I am still trying to better understand all of this before buying any materials.

I was thinking of installing this on an existing roof mounted satellite dish mast as I have removed the sat dish and have a nice mast which might work out ok for something like this.
 

completelycharged

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With solar the voltage raises upto a certain point where the maximum power is available and the search method for this ideal point is to reduce the voltage to find the maximum power output.

With a wind turbine the search is completely the opposite way around where any (search based tracking) tracks the voltage upwards to find the maximum power point.

This is the fundamental difference between solar and wind tracker.


Larger wind inverters typically have a preset voltage to amps setting because as the wind blows the turbine spins faster and the voltage is directly proportional to the speed. With wind the characteristics are fixed, unlike solar with clouds.

I have a 750W IstaBreeze unit, which I have had just over 1.2Kw out of, however this would have destroyed itself if I had not had the unit tied / fixed in one direction into the wind (to prevent the blades snapping when the unit turns out the wind) and the 24V unit was directly connected (via a bridge rectifier) to a 48V battery (to prevent winding burnout).

The fundamental thing with wind is the energy in the wind increases by the cube (wind x wind x wind) as the speed increases and the energy in high/storm winds can easily destroy any small turbine that can't turn out of the wind by any other means than the wind (self furling). It's the storms that will typically destroy the turbine either immediate failure or excess wear.
 

ajw22

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Before you start investing in wind, get a cheap $20 anemometer and measure how strong the wind is. Most people severely overestimate and blame the wind generator for not producing power.
I've read on many sites that on top of the roof / near buildings in general is a bad place for HAWTs. Obstructions cause turbulence, which is very bad for wind power. And the roof can direct the wind upwards, which from the POV of the turbine, is wind coming from the wrong direction.
Look into what reputable manufacturers recommend for the pole height, and clearance from nearby obstacles. I think the minimum starting point is 6m/20ft higher than any obstacles (incl roof) within a radius of 100m/300ft or so.
 

Crimp Daddy

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Good idea... I actually already have a decent anemometer and didn't even think to get some test readings at my proposed installation spot.

Ill throw it up there on a regular day and put a camera on it so I have an idea of what to expect.
 

hermitdave

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Aug 12, 2018
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Korishan said:
Depending on your location, you will need to choose a HAWT or a VAWT.
A HAWT (Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine) is best suited for turbulent, low speed winds. But they don't produce as much as the VAWT's.
A VAWT (Vertical Axial Wind Turbine) are best suited for large open flat lands with little or no obstructions. They need straight moving air.

Downside to a HAWT is that they produce less power. Upside is they can be placed in many locations at lower heights. They also can handle higher winds (like storm gusts) as there is no swinging back and forth. They are easier to lock in place, too.
Downside to a VAWT is that need height, the higher the better, and they need lots of space to keep the air from being turbulent. High speed winds are their enemy. You would need to get one with a very good locking mechanism to keep the blades from spinning in stormy weather.

As far as charge controllers go, you need a controller that is designed for wind turbines as they have a dump load connection. This is for when the batteries are full, the power generated can be offloaded somewhere. Turbines (both wind and hydro) need a dump load. They will burn themselves up if they don't have a dump load.

I think you have used VAWT and HAWT the wrong way around.

Vertical axis turbines like savonius, ice wind etc produce electricity starting 2.5 mph and are good for domestic usage. They also make less noise.

Horizontal 3 blade turbines are normally used for commercial applications.
 

Korishan

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hermitdave said:
I think you have used VAWT and HAWT the wrong way around.

Vertical axis turbines like savonius, ice wind etc produce electricity starting 2.5 mph and are good for domestic usage. They also make less noise.

Horizontal 3 blade turbines are normally used for commercial applications.

Hahaha, yeah. Whoops :p Corrected original post. Thnx Dave.

Here's an image:


A HAWT (Horizontal Axial Wind Turbine) are best suited for large open flat lands with little or no obstructions. They need straight moving air.
A VAWT (Vertical Axial Wind Turbine) is best suited for turbulent, low speed winds. But they don't produce as much as the VAWT's.
 

w0067814

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Jun 24, 2018
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Take a look over on the Navitron forum. There are a lot of experienced people on there with all things renewable. A wealth of good information on there.

https://www.navitron.org.uk/forum/index.php/board,8.0.html

Any building mounted wind turbine is basically a bad idea. The air shall be highly turbulent and contain very little energy. Sure, the blades shall spin away merrily but they won't produce much power. The turbine will often hover just below the cut-in point. There is also the loading that the turbine excerts on the building structure that it was never designed to take. You risk damaging the building if you've not done your structural calculations. Turbines also make noise, so you must consider this and how it will affect you and your neighbours. Don't forget that a building mounted turbine coupled the sound directly into what ever it is fixed to. If this is a wall it will act as a sounding board and amplify the sound. I've put up with a noisy wall hung boiler waking me up at 5am on winter mornings, no way I could stand a turbine all night!
 
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