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TP5000 module review (and technical details)
#1
[attachment=270]
Module as bought from ebay.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/351913464091
US$2.10 each (make offer for bulk purchase)

These modules come configured for LiFePO4 cells and 2A charging, for standard Lithium cobalt oxide cells or different charge rates there are minor mods to be made.


schematic diagram, modified from the chinese version to match the actual module.
Also here are the part numbers/values for the PCB itself.
U1 TP5000

R1 1.2kohm ?
R2 0 ohm
R3 R050 => 0.05ohm 50mOhm 2A charge

C1 0.1uF Vreg
C2 10uF Vin
C3 10uF Bat
C4 10uF Vs


Diagram showing the location of components to modify.
Light blue: short this with wire or '0' ohm resistor to switch for 4.2V standard lithium ion charging voltage.
Purple: Current sense/limit resistor, see table below for values.
(Note if you connect the lithium ion battery in reverse by accident, this resistor is the part that burns out.)

1ohm    100mA
200mOhm 500mA
100mOhm 1000mA
67mOhm  1500mA
50mOhm  2000mA

note: small 'm' denotes mili prefix, which is 1/1000th
All resistors are SMT 1210 size (3.2x1.6mm)
Lux_Gamer likes this post
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#2
So what's the advantage of using the TP5000 on LiIons over the TP4056? Other than 2A charge rate, which we don't really do on these anyways.
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#3
More efficient compared to TP4056.
Has optional temperature sensor (not shown as I cannot be sure I can solder to that pin)
Can be repaired if it fails, replacement resistors are 35c each (far less on ebay).
Come with fullsize LED, not tiny SMD versions which cannot be re-located.
Those using cell pairs or higher current tool battery cells will want the 2A setting.
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#4
Ahhh, gotcha. That makes more sense. The TP4056 also has a temperature pin. It's just not used on most of the boards.
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#5
Looks like these are about the same price now as they were two years ago. I only recently learned of these.

The biggest advantage I see is that it's a switch mode regulator instead of linear like the TP4056. That makes it a lot more efficient. Certainly better than the "3A" board with 4 TP4056 chips on it. I've read that that board only puts out around 2A anyway. For folks building those monster chargers with dozens of TP4056 boards, Using these instead could save quite a lot of energy. Even if they were dialled down to 1A.

I hadn't seen before exactly how to switch from Li-Ion to LiFePO4, or which resistor controls the output current. The picture above is very helpful!
Korishan likes this post
-Mike G
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#6
Wow, yeah, this is an old thread.

If I were to buy chargers now, it'd be the TP5100 modules. Really like what you mentioned, because of being a switching power regulator instead of linear. But also because of higher amp (can put more cells in parallel for rapid charging), and can be repurposed later on into other devices that need 6-9V (2s), or use 2s in conjunction with a buck converter for a super stable 5V. As well as the input range of the TP5100 has a huuuge range, which is really nice as you can use practically "any" wall based charger/powerbrick.


And, actually, now that I'm doing designing and building pcb's, I probably would/will make a charging bay using these. Using these are most likely down the development path of future projects.
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#7
I just got my DIY 18650 fever recently, still in the learning phase. I recently ordered me some TP5100 from China, and they are still on the way. My question is, is TP5100 an improved version of this TP5000, or are they just different beasts? I'm asking because they look alike and their names sound similar
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#8
I hadn't seen the TP5000 before. I had assumed the 5100 was the upgrade of the 4056. Not sure who makes the 5000, but it does have the same logo as the 4056 and the 5100, so I would assume it's the same company.
I looked a datasheet that is a rough translation, and looks very similar to the 5100. I didn't compare the two documents side-by-side, though.
Datasheet: https://voron.ua/files/pdf/Microshema/TP...lated_.pdf

It would be interesting to see what the differences are in performance between the two, though.
Proceed with caution. Knowledge is Power! Literally! Cool 
Knowledge is Power; Absolute Knowledge is Absolutely Shocking!
Certified 18650 Cell Reclamation Technician

Please come join in general chit-chat and randomness at Discord Chat (channels: general, 3d-printing, linux&coding, 18650, humor, ...)
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#9
Looks like you could put an SMD switch on the board to switch between LiIon and LiFe.
fannel and Korishan like this post
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#10
Korishan, thanks for your reply and the link to the datasheet

"Looks like you could put an SMD switch on the board to switch between LiIon and LiFe. "

Thanks Geek for the reply. I wish I could figure out how to toggle the charge current between 300 mA, 500 mA and 1000 mA
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