Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Solder versus Crimp
#21
(05-13-2018, 11:05 PM)gregoinc Wrote: Thanks, the copper grease looks interesting. But I suspect the product originally quoted is probably the way to go, given the copper talks about car brake parts, and the MG chemicals product looks purpose made for crimping cables. Thanks for the link  Smile

And lemme guess, you use Duct tape only for Air conditioning ducting work, right? Tongue It's multi-useful in what it can do. The only reason it was automotive was because that was that particular brand/type. There are others out there with different labels.
The copper stuff they use a lot in the Power Transmission Lines. It has good conductivity with no oxidizing. They also use a grey goop, not sure what that stuff is, but it's not uses as much.
Proceed with caution. Knowledge is Power! Literally! Cool 
Knowledge is Power; Absolute Knowledge is Absolutely Shocking!
Certified 18650 Cell Reclamation Technician

Please come join in general chit-chat and randomness at Discord Chat (channels: general, 3d-printing, linux&coding, 18650, humor, ...)
(this chat is not directly affiliated with SecondLifeStorage; VALID email req'd)
Reply
#22
I reckon crimp is probably the better option, provided its done with the correct tools and correct sizing (of cable and lug and tool). Consider almost all of our power distribution network uses crimped lugs.
Reply
#23
The other factor is physical "hold". Ie if a "solder only" joint starts to heat badly & the solder melts, the cable could come loose & short to something else. With crimping (or crimp then solder) that's not likely.
Running off solar, DIY & electronics fan :-)
Reply
#24
(05-13-2018, 11:58 PM)Korishan Wrote: And lemme guess,  you use Duct tape only for Air conditioning ducting work, right?  Tongue   It's multi-useful in what it can do.

Na, C'mon... Mythbusters proved duct tape has a multitude of uses... like building boats, bridges, car lift Big Grin

The point I so eloquently failed to make, the MG chemicals 'paste' seemed to be purpose made for crimping, without silicone, whereas a large number of the copper greases I found appeared to be spreading the net wide for multiple uses.

(05-14-2018, 06:02 AM)Rad Wrote: I reckon crimp is probably the better option, provided its done with the correct tools and correct sizing (of cable and lug and tool).

Tend to agree, which is why I am going to get the hydraulic crimper and appropriately sized lugs. If I have some spare cable I might even trail a crimp/solder connection, but for now I'll go with crimping only. Might even get some of that MG chemicals crimping paste.
Korishan and Rad like this post
<<< Contact me for quality used Yuasa LEV40 and LEV50 prismatic lithium batteries in Australia >>>
Reply
#25
(05-14-2018, 10:19 AM)gregoinc Wrote:
(05-13-2018, 11:58 PM)Korishan Wrote: And lemme guess,  you use Duct tape only for Air conditioning ducting work, right?  Tongue   It's multi-useful in what it can do.

Na, C'mon... Mythbusters proved duct tape has a multitude of uses... like building boats, bridges, car lift  Big Grin

The point I so eloquently failed to make, the MG chemicals 'paste' seemed to be purpose made for crimping, without silicone, whereas a large number of the copper greases I found appeared to be spreading the net wide for multiple uses.

(05-14-2018, 06:02 AM)Rad Wrote: I reckon crimp is probably the better option, provided its done with the correct tools and correct sizing (of cable and lug and tool).

Tend to agree, which is why I am going to get the hydraulic crimper and appropriately sized lugs. If I have some spare cable I might even trail a crimp/solder connection, but for now I'll go with crimping only. Might even get some of that MG chemicals crimping paste.

Just to be clear about the paste..  I do not use it between the wire and the lug..  I use it between the lug and the mating surface..  IE the battery, inverter, etc..  whatever the lug itself is connecting to

No need for it within the crimp
gregoinc and Korishan like this post
Reply
#26
Crimp, every time. I've done a lot (many, many, many) of battery and inverter cables in both 50mm2 and 70mm2 copper. I use 2 types of crimper, the generic chinese hydraulic ones with the hexagon dies and a genuine AMP single indent type. The chinese hydraulic ones are excellent, but the dies are often incorrectly marked. You want to use one die size smaller than they are stamped. For example, crimp the 50mm2 lugs with the dies marked 35mm2, other wise the crimps will fall off.

I was just doing some 70's last night with the indent crimper, definitely a fast and secure way to go.
Ibiza likes this post
Current system: 9.6kWh wet Nicad batteries, 16S1P Calb LiFePo4 210aH, Batrium WM4, Outback vfx3048 inverter, mx60 mppt controller, flexware 500 mounting hardware, 2.4kW solar array, 6kW lister diesel genset. MY'13 Vauxhall Ampera
Reply
#27
(05-15-2018, 11:04 AM)HughF Wrote: ...the dies are often incorrectly marked. You want to use one die size smaller than they are stamped. For example, crimp the 50mm2 lugs with the dies marked 35mm2, other wise the crimps will fall off.
Can be other causes too like copper isn't the diameter claimed or the lugs walls are too thin.
Running off solar, DIY & electronics fan :-)
Reply
#28
(05-15-2018, 11:19 AM)Redpacket Wrote:
(05-15-2018, 11:04 AM)HughF Wrote: ...the dies are often incorrectly marked. You want to use one die size smaller than they are stamped. For example, crimp the 50mm2 lugs with the dies marked 35mm2, other wise the crimps will fall off.
Can be other causes too like copper isn't the diameter claimed or the lugs walls are too thin.

It can, but it's usually the fact the chinese mis-mark the dies on those things... going one size down has never caused me any issue.
Current system: 9.6kWh wet Nicad batteries, 16S1P Calb LiFePo4 210aH, Batrium WM4, Outback vfx3048 inverter, mx60 mppt controller, flexware 500 mounting hardware, 2.4kW solar array, 6kW lister diesel genset. MY'13 Vauxhall Ampera
Reply
#29
(05-15-2018, 11:26 AM)HughF Wrote:
(05-15-2018, 11:19 AM)Redpacket Wrote:
(05-15-2018, 11:04 AM)HughF Wrote: ...the dies are often incorrectly marked. You want to use one die size smaller than they are stamped. For example, crimp the 50mm2 lugs with the dies marked 35mm2, other wise the crimps will fall off.
Can be other causes too like copper isn't the diameter claimed or the lugs walls are too thin.

It can, but it's usually the fact the chinese mis-mark the dies on those things... going one size down has never caused me any issue.
Hey Hugh, I've never heard from your friend re. Nissan Leaf batts. If you are in contact with him could ask him to send me a SMS please. I'll PM you my cell no. Ok?
Reply
#30


For soldering heat the end up where the bolt hole is at around 45 degrees with the small hole facing upwards and then feed the solder into the small hole at the end of the lug. This way it keeps more of the heat away from the cable plastic, strip the plastic back a bit and then use 2-4 layers of heat shrink over the top to cover.

Lugs will only heat up at one point and that is the junction between the circular and flat section as this can be the thinest cross section for current to flow, which is more visible in the incorrect desing for high amps image....

Crimp twice.. no flared ends.
Korishan and gregoinc like this post
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)