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Dala's Leaf buildthread (2015 Nissan Leaf)
Hi Dala,

Thanks for your reply and suggestions, I do really appreciate !

I am pretty sure the newer battery was from a AZE0 as the cells was not the 'sardine can' type, busbars and wires was all different.

The CAN bridge, can I purchase this from ?

If I had known that it was possible to swap the complete battery box as you did, I would have done that.

You are right, it was a risky business to swap the cells, I'm well aware of the danger involved.
A few years back a guy working at some pipes over a large bank of power-backup batteries.
He dropped a spanner, shortcutting the busbars connecting the batteries.
The spanner completely 'blow up', literally vaporising. Luckily no-one was injured during this accident!

Next project is to modify my charger to be controlled remotely ie. through MQTT.
This way I would be able to charge my car when my SolarPanels are producing power or when the tarif on power is low during nighttime.
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(02-05-2020, 12:50 PM)ARiis Wrote: Hi Dala,

Thanks for your reply and suggestions, I do really appreciate !

I am pretty sure the newer battery was from a AZE0 as the cells was not the 'sardine can' type, busbars and wires was all different.

The CAN bridge, can I purchase this from ?

If I had known that it was possible to swap the complete battery box as you did, I would have done that.

You are right, it was a risky business to swap the cells, I'm well aware of the danger involved.
A few years back a guy working at some pipes over a large bank of power-backup batteries.
He dropped a spanner, shortcutting the busbars connecting the batteries.
The spanner completely 'blow up', literally vaporising. Luckily no-one was injured during this accident!

Next project is to modify my charger to be controlled remotely ie. through MQTT.
This way I would be able to charge my car when my SolarPanels are producing power or when the tarif on power is low during nighttime.

Good, so you didn't use the newer busbars! Good thing you didn't because the wiring changed, so the only way to do the bruteforce is to only use the newer cells.

You can fill out the contact form on my website, www.dalasevrepair.fi But the price of a can-bridge, the time needed to install it, I would recommend you to simply wait until spring, and let the BMS learn the capacity. The SOH and range estimation will go up! It's just the capacity bars that wont come back. So the bridge will only fix those, not worth it imo.
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I delivered two cars this week!  Big Grin

First one up was a JDM 2010 that needed a new battery and a new heater system (Fuse and PTC). This was the one I posted about a few posts up.

Second one was a USDM 2011 that came from a Texas flood. The car was did not go in ready mode and threw 100 error codes. After some tinkering with some connectors, and a fresh battery, the car sprung to life. Picture related.


Feels good resurrecting something that was completely dead Smile

So now for something completely different. Both customers were generous, and left me with the original EVSE that came with the car. This is due to them not being useful in Finland, due to 230V mains.

So lets look a bit closer at the OEM Nissan "granny"-chargers.

First up is the OG Japanese 2010 unit. This one is specified to run at 200VAC, and charge with 15A. This totals up to a total watt draw of (P=UI, P=200*15) 3000W. Note also the exotic plug.


Next is the USDM 2011 unit. This one is specced to run at 120VAC and charge with 12A. This totals up to (120*12)= 1440W. This one is really slow! Note also the exotic plug.


So lets take the USDM unit apart and inspect it. To take these apart you need to drill out the backside to expose the screws. Good way to spot any voided warranties.


And here is the inside. It is extremely well put together. Note the glued PCB, GFCI circuit and general sturdy construction. This thing is built to last. The transformer could in theory be swapped from an 120VAC IN, 20.9 VAC OUT to a more EU friendly 230VAC IN, but I think that is more suited to the JDM unit that already is made for 200V and 15A. So from this unit I will be salvaging the Type1 cable.


And what to do with the Type1 cable you might ask? I ofcourse put it into good use for the OpenEVSE unit that I ordered last year. I mounted it at my parents garage, foreshadowing something Wink
lnxpro likes this post
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Hahah, I like how you say they are exotic plugs Tongue That's what we use over here in the US.



This one I think has one of the blades turned 90* to the other blade, correct? If so, this is standard for plugs here to designate they are 240V. However, it is strange that it specifically says 200VAC, not 220VAC or 240VAC. Most of our devices run between 210 - 240VAC that uses a full phase (we have split single-phase standard house installations. 3-phase is not common here)



And this one is standard 120VAC plug Wink

Perhaps the owners either bought the vehicles in or from the US or the wrong chargers were included for your area(?)
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I'm pretty sure the charger came from Japan, more than that I don't know Smile

So I went on a mission last Sunday. A customer wanted help with a ZE0 24->30kWh swap, so I compiled software and hit the road. Here are some of my thoughts on using a Leaf for longer journeys.

I started the day by collecting all tools that I would need. The customer already did all the heavy lifting and only needed the CAN-bridge and a new main fuse. And yes, you always need duct tape and zipties Wink


I checked the route with 'A Better Routeplanner', this will be extremely easy with the 40kWh Leaf. This is a really good tool for planning longer trips, and gives you a good estimate on how long you'll need to charge. In the end, I spent less time charging, since I could also charge while working on the customer car. The trip was about 500km in total.


So the route from Vaasa->Rauma is E8, though a bit desolate, which has some really nice Fortum fastchargers. These run entirely off renewables!


So the job went extremely well, had the customer car up and running in about an hour and a half. I then drove back to Vaasa. After the last fastcharge, the temperature of the battery pack was approaching the thermal limit. The 40kWh pack suffers from something called rapidgate (which is overheating after many quickcharges in a row). Thankfully it's now winter, so the battery did not hit the thermal limit, but if this would have been +25*C ambient conditions, it would have throttled the charging for sure.


Mux' blog has a great post with technical explanations on this topic if someone is interested in learning more how to manage a battery. https://ssj3gohan.tweakblogs.net/

So to summarize, awesome trip, extremely cheap way to travel, satisfied customer and hot battery Smile
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