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Dala's Leaf buildthread (2015 Nissan Leaf)
#81
Last time I did my brakes I replaced the pin boots and applied liberal Silicone grease to them. 3 of them were dry and rusted. Also clearance the area on the caliper where the pads move and apply grease there too.
******Hi My name is Jason and I have SOCD (Solar Obsessive Compulsive Disorder)*******
Current Powerwall - 1400 Cells 7s200p (modular 40p packs) ~ 12kWh of storage     4x 315W Canadian Solar Panels

Working on the next 7s40p packs     ~2.5kWh

Waiting on 2000 Cells of unused Sony vt4 (2000mah 30A) ~ 15kWh      hehehehehe  More Power
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#82
I am soon going on a work trip to Australia but it was postponed one week, so I'm trying to do a quick sideproject until then.

It hit me that I need a way to read the battery health and stats from batteries not currently in a car. There are very pricey solutions already on the market, but I think I can make one for a fraction of the price. Might also learn something.

This is the B24 connector from a 2017 Leaf Battery. This is a proprietary 'Yazaki' connector that is extremely hard, if not impossible to source.  I've removed this from the pack so I can more easily test and take measurements. 3d printing is the only sensible option here.


Here is the pinout for the connector


Now what we want is a way to connect the EV-CAN to an OBD2 port, and some way to power the whole thing with an external 12V battery. The battery only wakes up if +12V is applied to it. Will need to come up with some battery solution.

Here is the first 2013+ prototype printed.


Now just to wait for the glue to dry and solder an OBD2 port on the other end!
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#83
this is awesome. Can you provide a wiring diagram to an OBD adapter? I could then use that plus a 12v battery to power up the BMS to read the statistics of the pack that is outside of a car.
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#84
I am sure this will work, since there is a 'BMS option' in Leafspy, here's a snippet from the help document

"For those using LeafSpy to monitor a standalone Leaf battery pack there is the BMS option which is located at the top of the list where 2010 would have been located. Selecting this option forces LeafSpy to read only data from the BMS (Battery Management System) and skips trying to read data from any other ECU. When BMS mode is selected the words "BMS Only" will flash bottom center as a reminder that only BMS data is being read."

(10-15-2019, 01:59 AM)lnxpro Wrote: this is awesome. Can you provide a wiring diagram to an OBD adapter? I could then use that plus a 12v battery to power up the BMS to read the statistics of the pack that is outside of a car.

Yes! I am going to experiment tonight if I have time, here is my guesstimate

B24:                      OBD2:       12V lead battery
  • 1 EV CAN-H  PIN 6
  • 2 EV CAN-L  PIN 14
  • 4 IGN ?        PIN 16      +12V
  • 5 BAT ?       PIN 16      +12V
  • 6 GND3       PIN 4&5     GND
  • 7 GND2       PIN 4&5     GND
  • 8 GND1       PIN 4&5     GND
I am a bit unsure how to power the thing, if I need BAT or IGN or maybe both?
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#85
This might be helpful to you Dala, it's the turn-on sequence. For just reading pack status, you can just power both IGN and BAT statically I believe.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0IozEyeGSk




These are all for the 2011 Leaf though, as the info I was collecting was for my own 2011.
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#86
The tire pressure warning system stayed on after I installed the winter tires. I ran the pairing procedure and that fixed it. But isn't the Leaf supposed to be able to keep two set of tires in memory?


I made some changes to the .STL file. I only have the necessary pins exposed, making for a simpler to use connector. It also prints faster.


I used the schematic posted by rev0, and put both IGN and BAT to +12V. I then connected everything else up to my 40kWh battery that is sitting in storage. I'm using an external 12V power supply to wake it up, and a Konnwei OBD2 bluetooth adapter to pass it on to the phone.


And here is the result! It works b-e-a-utifully!


In the above screenshot, you can see that I put Leafspy into 'BMS only' mode via the service screen. This allows it to read only the data from the BMS, and not trigger a multitude of errors due to missing modules and signals. The battery sits at a nice 56% SOC, perfect for storage until I come back from my trip to Australia. SOH is also at a cool 95,9%, and the mV diff is only 14mV. In other words, this battery is in perfect health!

Now to make this into a how to and release the .STL files!
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#87
(10-15-2019, 01:59 AM)lnxpro Wrote: this is awesome. Can you provide a wiring diagram to an OBD adapter? I could then use that plus a 12v battery to power up the BMS to read the statistics of the pack that is outside of a car.

Github page is now live! https://github.com/dalathegreat/Nissan-L...ry-to-OBD2

EDIT:
Also added the link to dalasevrepair.fi
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#88
Okay so I am back from Australia, and I've been going hard at the Leaf. Last weekend I undertook the big project of getting a clean 24->40kWh upgrade performed (2018 ZE1 battery into 2015 AZE0 chassis). Clean meaning no modifications to the battery, simply plugging in the 2018 40kWh pack into the 2015 24kWh chassis.

I've been cooperating with Muxsan to make this possible, and this is the thing I'm not allowed to spill all the beans on. But spoiler alert, it works B-E-A-utifully.

I started with installing the 40kWh battery in my Leaf. This is standard procedure by now, takes me ~2h to get it done. I took the opportunity to install the uprated fuse that came with the 40kWh pack, 250A? vs the stock 150A? (someone correct me if I'm wrong on the spec).
[Image: K5cG7EX.jpg]

To verify that everything was OK, I started the car. This resulted in the DTC P3102 - 'Invalid battery EVC-201', along with Check EV-System yellow warning light and the infamous turtle icon. Meaning the car would drive, but with a constant limp-mode. The Full-Service-Manual says that "Li-ion Battery ID Registration must be performed if the Li-ion battery controller or VCM is replaced.". It then goes on about using correct parts and methods, and tells you how to solve this with the unobtainable Consult+3 tool along with a special ID card that should be installed in the special Nissan approved Laptop. Since we don't have this, we'll handle it another way.
[Image: 8JzFH0k.jpg]

So to fix this, you pull up a CAN log from when the car was working, and place it side by side with the new CAN data. Then it's just a matter of spot the differences, using the community CAN database as a reference. https://github.com/dalathegreat/leaf_can_bus_messages
[Image: nYNzNhE.png]

Then it's just a matter of using a CAN-in-the-middle attack on the bus, spoofing certain messages, dropping a few and voila! The car is booting successfully without error messages.
[Image: QK5K8Lj.jpg]

I won't lie, there are some bugs, now it's time to test it properly and fix those as we go along. Still, extremely satisfied with the clean swap, it saves so much time compared to the brute-force method. I'll take working with software any day over hardware issues. I really like where the EV-tuning community is heading Smile
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#89
Here is a fun side-project

Ever since I started using the awesome 40kWh pack, it has been on the back of my mind to keep it in good shape. One if the best ways to keep a Nissan Leaf LMNO2 based battery in good state of health is to keep it cool. Since I can't affect the weather and Finland is quite cold all round the year, I started thinking about other ways to keep the health up. The second biggest factor when it comes to lithium battery life is to reduce the time spent at high voltage. You might have noticed this with your phone already, if you charge it during the night, it will sit at 100% for most of the night, accelerating degradation. To summarize lithium battery longevity;

1. Keep it cool
2. Reduce time spent at high voltage
3. For long term storage, store at really low SOC (25-35%)
More good reading here: https://www.electricbike.com/how-to-make...tery-last/

Funfact, the 2011-2013 24kWh Leafs had the option to charge to max 80%, but Nissan decided to remove it for 2013+ models. It didn't make much sense to limit the small batterypack, but nowadays when we have bigger 30/40/62KWh packs, we do want them to last.

So how do we implement this #2 for the Leaf? It takes too much brainpower and effort to run an unplug the car at the desired max %, so I wanted a software solution. Ofcourse this solution will be made with the Muxsan CAN-bridge, but first lets sketch up some user stories

1. The max charge % shall be set via already existing buttons on the Leaf (hidden functionality), so that no modification to the Leaf will be required
2. The setting shall be visualized on the dashboard, so that the user knows what he is configuring
3. The range should be in steps between 50%->100%, so that maximum battery life can be obtained

First thing is to figure out what buttons are available on the EV-CAN, where the CAN-bridge resides. I attached my laptop to the EV-can, and started mashing buttons. Unfortunately, none of the steering wheel buttons were available on the bus, so I had to settle with the HVAC system. I ultimately decided on a combination of two, the fresh air recirculation button and fan speed. Here is what figuring out the fanspeed looked like.
[Image: NISNw0F.png]

So my v1.0 program does a check if (recirc == ON && fanSpeed == 7). When these conditions are met, the capacity bars on the dash start to cycle thru all the available options. When the desired bar is illuminated, say 10/12, you confirm the selection by turning down the fan speed OR turning off recirc.

Here is a video of v1.0 in use, setting it to 10/12 = 83% max charge


Next step is to add longer delays (was tricky to set correctly with 1s delay), charge options all the way down to 50%, and make the dash charge% represent which selection you finally landed on (since it can be hard with only the capacity bars). I'll hopefully have some spare time this weekend to make it more user friendly.

Fingers crossed, this pack should last until 2030 now Big Grin
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#90
(12-04-2019, 08:10 AM)Dala Wrote: So my v1.0 program does a check if (recirc == ON && fanSpeed == 7). When these conditions are met, the capacity bars on the dash start to cycle thru all the available options. When the desired bar is illuminated, say 10/12, you confirm the selection by turning down the fan speed OR turning off recirc.

Next step is to add longer delays (was tricky to set correctly with 1s delay), charge options all the way down to 50%, and make the dash charge% represent which selection you finally landed on (since it can be hard with only the capacity bars). I'll hopefully have some spare time this weekend to make it more user friendly.

Fingers crossed, this pack should last until 2030 now Big Grin

Excellent, I didn't know you could manipulate the capacity bars, everything I read said you're stuck with a decreasing capacity only for that gauge. My Leaf had the cells swapped and the BMS correctly reports a SoH of 87% now with the new-old cells, but the capacity bars still show a 5-bar pack, what it was before replacement. I guess that means the muxsan system can update the state of health to the real value of the combined pack then.
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