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wind energy.
#11
If you're in the UK, you're unlikely to have enough solar power in the winter to fully power the heatpump. Perhaps you can do what I do: get a time-of-use electric plan. Try to manage with solar and powerwall during the peak times, and just use grid power during off-peak hours. It's cheap and pretty green, too, since fuel burning power plants are likely to be off/idling during off-peak times.
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#12
(11-27-2019, 10:02 AM)ajw22 Wrote: If you're in the UK, you're unlikely to have enough solar power in the winter to fully power the heatpump. Perhaps you can do what I do: get a time-of-use electric plan. Try to manage with solar and powerwall during the peak times, and just use grid power during off-peak hours. It's cheap and pretty green, too, since fuel burning power plants are likely to be off/idling during off-peak times.

I'm on specialised tariff which gives me low rate 10 hours from 2100 GMT every weekday night and entire weekend.

Yes I'm planning something like that.
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#13
@awj22.
Interesting.
Can you give me some more info please.
Or provide some links.
I would like to expand my knowledge, cous what they are offering in holland, is not much.

Thanks in advance
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#14
ajw22, it seems like there are lots of power options in the UK! I'm just curious if you ever see prices go negative on your time-of-use plan and if you monitor prices manually or if you have some sort of program to automate your switching from grid to battery and back again?

Where I'm at in the US, a time-of-use plan is available, and I've seen prices go negative occasionally. Last night, between midnight and 5AM, prices stayed at 0.5 cents (US$0.005) or less per kilowatt. But I've also seen them go to 50 cents (US$0.50) per kilowatt for brief periods of high demand as well. There are also plans that give free electricity every night between 7 and 11PM, that I'm considering exploiting if I can get my batteries to charge fast enough. And if I can get my system automated. I've reached out to a few people working on peak-shaving, but they all seem to abandon their projects. It's a cool idea if I can get it to work!
Formerly known as Dallski
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#15
I have a very simplified time-of-use plan: fixed high rates during the day, and about 1/3 price during the off-peak hours of 11pm~7am. There's some slight variability depending on market fuel prices, but it's just +/-10% or so. No hope of ever approaching zero.

I've updated my project page (see sig) to show how I've automated usage of the off-peak rate.
In short: RaspberryPi BMS monitor controls GTIs via a TP-Link HS105 Smart Wifi Plugs.
I _could_ use the same system to charge the batteries from the grid during off-peak times, but I don't think it's worth it, considering the additional wear on the batteries and conversion inefficiencies involved. Not to mention that saving a few $ on electricity is not my main motivation.

100kwh-hunter: Can't say much about electric rates in Holland. https://www.mainenergie.nl/en/thuis-tarieven/ seems to offer something, but the off-peak rates are almost the same. ...or were you asking about the heat pumps?
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#16
That's a really clever and simple way to do it! Having fixed rates at times makes it even easier, you can set a time and forget about it. Nice setup, btw!

I guess there are two different time-of-use plans, one that has fixed rates at different times of the day, and one that has variable rates based on actual prices on the electricity market. If you want to see what I'm talking about, check this out for the second type of plan from my utility, and you can see negative rates if you scroll back to November 21, and $0.507/kwh on November 18.
Formerly known as Dallski
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#17
Heat pumps and windenergie in particular.
I would like to have some good stuff and not the pre roberment payed stuff, i am cured, sorry
Don't fall for that scam from mainenergie...the after bill would be a big surprise.
They sound cheap, the cheapest in the Netherlands is greenchoice.

Best
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#18
(11-28-2019, 06:48 PM)100kwh-hunter Wrote: Heat pumps and windenergie in particular.
I would like to have some good stuff and not the pre roberment payed stuff, i am cured, sorry
Don't fall for that scam from mainenergie...the after bill would be a big surprise.
They sound cheap, the cheapest in the Netherlands is greenchoice.

Best

Heatpump are like refrigeration unit. Depending upon what you install you can either heating only or heating and cooling option.

In UK, heating only option are supported by renewable heating incentives. Normally they pull 3x amount of heat compared to what they consume
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#19
There are many types of heatpump systems, but what they all have in common is that they use one unit of energy (kWh) to move ("pump") about 3 units of heat energy into the home. So compared to other electrical heating units (eg. fan heater, oil heater, toasters, etc), heatpumps use just 1/3 the electricity.

One type sucks warmth from the ground and pumps the heat into the house. Effective, but need quite a lot of digging to get it installed.

The most common heatpump system is the Ductless Mini-Split Air Conditioners (lots of similar names), which extracts warmth from the outside air. Some can only cool, but most nowadays can be reversed into heating mode, too. I'm sure you've seen them before:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07XHNWJQQ

Of course the device is a bit pricier than simple heating units, but over time it will be cheaper due to the 1/3 consumption of electricity.
Installation is not that difficult (see YouTube), but you may need to hire a licensed technician (electricity + refrigerant) depending on your region.

One common complaint with these units is "they just don't work in the winter", but that's often due the outdoor device getting snowed in. Another common cause is that a too small device is made to work at full power for too long. Like with a freezer, ice builds up over time, reducing the efficiency.
If you have very harsh winters, there are specialized units that have modifications optimized for winter operations, too. Like hoods to deflect snow, strategically placed heating elements for removing ice, etc.
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#20
Another thing that keeps them from working during winter is if it's too cold. If the heat isn't ample enough to be captured, then it can't be transferred inside. The colder it is outside, the harder it is to get heat to transfer inside.
Agreed with making sure the outside unit not be covered in snow. It needs air flow to work properly.
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