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How can I remove these tabs?
#11
(11-08-2019, 09:55 PM)Korishan Wrote: Use side cutters to trim as close as possible.On the positive end, you could rip them off. However, the negative end takes a bit more fineness and is more fragile as you could rip a hole in the casing.
I suspect I've salvaged more tool batteries than anyone else...



... and yes, I agree, you can banana peel the positive terminals off just fine. The negatives you can't, as the nickle connector strip is as thick as the cell casing, and it's 50/50 which side the weld nugget rips from, with 4 spot weld per battery you're almost guaranteed a puncture followed by a hiss-and-piss.

The same will happen a significant portion of the time if you try to use flush cutters. Any type (I'm a plier and side cutter snob, I must have 50 pairs of each).

The only consistent method I've found, is a narrow chisel, and whacking it 3-5 times lightly with a light hammer (light enough it bounces, like, 1/4 the weight of a normal claw hammer, plastic head ideally). You don't want to force it or try to get it all done in one blow, you don't want to cut or catch the chisel into the surface (it will, and it will start to cut into the case). You almost want to shatter the weld with a bouncing motion so the blade settles against the actual weld nugget, not the case. Like you were holding the edge of a frisbee and hammering with the flat of the plate. Bonk bonk bonk bonk bonk.

You want to avoid peeling them, only enough to get the chisel in, as that creates a little lifted peak out of the case around the welds, which then the chisel will cut through and puncture. It took me, I dunno... 50 or 100 or so before I got the right touch to not be cutting holes in them. My failure rate at the start was like, 30%, but it quickly dropped off to nearly 0%.

I've been meaning to make a full tutorial on disassembling tool batteries, but, lemme spackle together a quick demo from old footage:



It was hard to demo on the ground, and the desk/cardboard takes up too much of the impact. You want it held solidly. The second one is typical. I normally put a 2x4 on the ground, and then the cell on the 2x4, with my shoe stepping on the cell to hold it steady instead of using my hand like I did in the video. Then tap-tap-tap-tap-clink. Repeat. Faster than using cutters even when that's an option.
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#12
(11-14-2019, 05:44 AM)MattsAwesomeStuff Wrote: ... and yes, I agree, you can banana peel the positive terminals off just fine. The negatives you can't, as the nickle connector strip is as thick as the cell casing, and it's 50/50 which side the weld nugget rips from, with 4 spot weld per battery you're almost guaranteed a puncture followed by a hiss-and-piss.

I guess it depends on what cells you're harvesting. I've processed tens of thousands of cells and only had a small handful that were punctured after tearing off the nickel. My cells are all from laptop batteries though. This probably wouldn't work with power tool or ebike batteries where the nickel is much thicker.
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#13
If you have a angle grinder(small one), thick disk(for inox) and a steady hand, you could grind of those clips.
BUT don't touch the cells body, only weaken the clip.
Dremel will do the same but at a lower rate than a angle grinder.
Put them into a vice and knock yourself out

Weaken the clip just enough to get the clip off.
Mind you, there are clips of copper.....

It will take some practice, heck..try ten times on one cell before the clip is weak enough, or go to deep with one cell(plus side NOT neg side)
You will be fast in reclaiming good undamaged secondhand cells.

Best

MattsAwesomeStuff wrote:
I suspect I've salvaged more tool batteries than anyone else...

If that is all....Sorry, but no Big Grin , don't want to insult or anything, but it was a suspicion Big Grin

With love Cool
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#14
MattsAwesomeStuff - Thanks for all the information, and the video. Helps a lot to see it being done.

(11-14-2019, 06:20 PM)100kwh-hunter Wrote: If you have a angle grinder(small one), thick disk(for inox) and a steady hand, you could grind of those clips.
BUT don't touch the cells body, only weaken the clip.
Dremel will do the same but at a lower rate than a angle grinder.
Put them into a vice and knock yourself out

I have a pretty well kitted out workshop at work, so may give it a go with the Dremel, feel more comfortable with that for smaller jobs than the grinder.
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#15
(11-14-2019, 04:12 PM)mike Wrote: I guess it depends on what cells you're harvesting. I've processed tens of thousands of cells and only had a small handful that were punctured after tearing off the nickel. My cells are all from laptop batteries though. This probably wouldn't work with power tool or ebike batteries where the nickel is much thicker.

Yes, that's my point exactly.

You can peel off the negative terminals on laptop cells all day. The material of the strip is 1/3 the thickness of the cell casing. On tool packs they're closer to the same thickness and it's almost impossible to avoid damaging a cell.

"100kwhHunter Wrote:If that is all....Sorry, but no [Image: biggrin.png] , don't want to insult or anything, but it was a suspicion

Specifically, tool battery packs. Not laptop cells. I'm nowhere near the top for cells in general. I hardly see anyone salvage tool packs and 100% of mine are tool packs.

Again, might be wrong, my hunch was based on the differences in disassembly (due to strip thickness) and the lack of knowledge that a difference exists or what to do about it.
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#16
@MattsAwesomeStuff.
I was referring to tool packs, that's why i love my grinder so much.
Again, i did not mean to insult, irritate or trigger, please accept my apologies.

Btw if you want some "old" hilti pack(s) (22v 5,2a) and you have a 3d printer, maybe we can make a trade?
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