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controling 3phase motor
#1
Hello,
i am new to the electricity and don't have experience
i am a computer engineer and i am doing a new project that need to control a motor

i have a large fan with a motor that has
1.5HP
380V
2.5 A

i want to control it by Arduino
but i don't have any idea what part do i need to control some high power like this never worked with them
so any idea about the parts that i need for this?
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#2
You might get a lot more experience talk by heading over to an EV forum. Not saying there aren't some smart coder/controller/etc guys here, but there's a lot more over on the EV forums. Over there they regularly work with 3-phase motors and custom controllers.
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#3
There is a huge number of manufacturers/devices that can be used. Basically, it splits into 2 categories:

1. Use a "contactor". It's basically a mechanical heavy duty relay that can be used to turn on/off 3 phase power. The Arduino does not have enough power to control a contactor directly, so you will have to put in an intermediary relay or SolidStateRelay.
Cost: US$20~50
E.g.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01J4Z9MK0
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077XB9GCQ


2. Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). They generally have many different inputs, so controlling from Arduino should not be a problem. You can not only turn the 3 phase motor ON/OFF, but also set the speed, direction, acceleration, and more.
Cost: US$100+
Eg.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07VXGCMM2

*** The devices in the links are just to give you an idea what they look like. They may (or may not be) crap and/or suitable in your case ***
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#4
This is the same thing as the motors from hard-drives, but at a larger scale. Maybe studying those can help.
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