Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Proper Testing Load for ZB2L3
#1
Hello, I am currently working on a DIY tester with ZB2l3 ( nothing really new ahaha) and I would like to know which load give the best/real results.
ok I learned around about relation between load and test....

So can you guys help me finaly stick to 1 or 2 number for the load.

I mean should I use 7.5 ohm, or 3.75 ohm (2 x 7.5 ohm parallel) or maybe serie them, so 15 ohm ??

or maybe 10ohm, got 10ohm/10W, guess 10w is better because of heat and all that...

I know that, the choosed load (7.5 , 3.75 or 15 ohm) will be load applied to the batteries during testing, so load 1.12 A or 0.56A or 0.28A ( gotten with ohm law Shy ....)  so which combo, gave you best or real result with this tester??

PS: I already kind of did some dignostic on my ZB2l3, and voltage is surprisingly very pricise!! Lab PS 3.9V, and the tester also ready 3.9v (choosed any voltage just to see if the tester i read the voltage correctly) so guess no need calibration, and mess its calibration.

Also checked my ceramic resistors, and I get around 7.6 ohm, maybe additional resistance of cable aligator clips... anyway I will got with those, that what I got......

Info: I am a hobbist, I use 18650s in small project to make them portable, got a few 18650 from laptop batterie, and wanna stort them... So my use will not be very crazy load, 0.5A to 1A max , I guess...
So thx for any help guys  Big Grin
Reply
#2
I would pick the load that best represents the real world loads the cell will see.  This would give you the most accurate representation of the cells in use.

As an example, if you have a 10p pack that will see a 5 amp load, then the 0.56A load would be most representative of actual capacity.

Alternately, if you wanted to stress test cells to cull out the weaker ones, then 1A would be a better load.
ZipZwan likes this post
Reply
#3
(05-04-2020, 09:56 PM)Crimp Daddy Wrote: I would pick the load that best represents the real world loads the cell will see.  This would give you the most accurate representation of the cells in use.

As an example, if you have a 10p pack that will see a 5 amp load, then the 0.56A load would be most representative of actual capacity.

Alternately, if you wanted to stress test cells to cull out the weaker ones, then 1A would be a better load.
Thx you a lot for the info, I think I will for a load for 0.56A (even though, I noticed that this tester take the 7.5 ohm as a load of 0.510-0.520 A) , though not a big deal, I think for my future application of those recycled 18650.
Also maybe while I am at it, I will make a switch for option a: load 7.5/ 0.56A
                                                                           option b: load 3.75 /1.12A
Like this:
Like that if I need to stress the bat during some tests as you mentioned , I will not need to deconnect & reconnect another load, I did it during some testing, and kind of long after a while, so why dont just make a switch between "soft load"   <>   "heavy load"
Thx   Wink
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)