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Probably the most basic portable laptop pack
#11
I just made this. 20p7s into bms into buck into mac.
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#12
(06-04-2020, 12:12 PM)camthecam Wrote: I just made this. 20p7s into bms into buck into mac.

That's awesome! How long does it run? What buck converter does it use?
Aren't you too young to be playing around with Lithium-Ion batteries?
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#13
I think you mean 7s20p Wink I only see 1 bms, not 7
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#14
(06-04-2020, 03:10 PM)THEWHITEBOY503 Wrote:
(06-04-2020, 12:12 PM)camthecam Wrote: I just made this. 20p7s into bms into buck into mac.

That's awesome! How long does it run? What buck converter does it use?
Banggood dc-dc cc cv buck 7-32 in 1.2-28 out 8Amps. Mac runs on 19-20v and my hp runs on 19 so I have it set it at 19.5 and it charges Mac ok.I haven't drained it yet. Only made it 'cos I wasn't going to buy new batt for the HP.
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#15
Last update for a while.
I put 5 batts in series and connected it to the laptop, and something must of shorted because it got really hot, but now my laptop isn't charging. So I'm gonna have to send off my laptop that I haven't even been using for a month to service and go back to my crappy surface book.

This project was a mistake anyways, but thank you to the people who looked over my lazy designs.
Aren't you too young to be playing around with Lithium-Ion batteries?
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#16
May actually be a battery issue. That'll be a lot cheaper to repair
More 18650 cells I can use!
Aren't you too young to be playing around with Lithium-Ion batteries?
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#17
Hey guys, my buck converter arrived a few days ago. I plugged in my eBike battery to test it and it works! It doesn't have a display, so I had to use a voltmeter to set the voltage. It has a current adjustment setting as well, and it claims it can do "up to 20 amps". 
[Image: image0.jpg]
My laptop won't charge still. New battery didn't fix it, but I ordered a new mainboard. But the light still comes up when I plug it in, and sure enough, it works! I have another Asus laptop (not as powerful as this one) that charges using the same size connector and voltage range, and I was able to charge it up all the way on the eBike battery, and the buck converter didn't get hot at all!
I'm having my brother 3D print me a holder for the batteries and buck converter. Here's the wiring for that:
[Image: k64YsK.png]

Hoping I can get my laptop up and running, as well as this battery pack to a point where it WON'T EXPLODE!

Also, I was recently employed, so now I have funding for these stupid projects. 
Cheers!

I almost forgot, here is the mount. It's printing as I'm typing this.
[Image: unknown.png]
Aren't you too young to be playing around with Lithium-Ion batteries?
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#18
I haven't drilled the holes for the DC-DC, but it works! 
I know my wiring isn't exactly neat, but hey, it works!!!!! I'm more of a function over fashion person too. I bet people at school will be asking me questions about this (if they don't think it's a bomb).

(note: this is a different laptop, but it uses the same charging port and voltage.)
It even charges off my variable power supply!

(4.2v*7=29.4v charging)

Thank you guys for all the pointers! I'll come back when I get my real laptop fixed and can give stats on how much it extends my runtime!
Aren't you too young to be playing around with Lithium-Ion batteries?
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#19
(06-01-2020, 06:42 PM)THEWHITEBOY503 Wrote: [...] I've been playing around with making a spare battery to connect to the charge port of my AsusN56JN [...]
At first, I was going to use 9 LGEAMF11865 cells wired in series, with a DC-DC "buck" converter to step it down to 19V. The laptop charges at roughly 17.6-23v, and the actual charger supplies 19v. However, I've gone through 5 DC-DC converters (4 of the same model), 1 due to a fault on my end, and one couldn't output enough (1.5A) amperage, but 3 of them have failed due to overheating (even after extreme heatsinking) [...]

Those ubiquitous cheap low-quality buck converters are a PITA (and unsafe). But nowadays - due to PD (Power Delivery)  needs, we can get cheap high-quality modern versions that are much smaller and more efficient and will also output QC (Quick Charge) and PD (Power Delivery) up to 100W, so you can use them for almost anything. For example, below is one scheme I use.

In the upper-left of the photo is a WITRN DC 2 PD 100W/5A buck converter that is about the size of a 9V battery.  This efficiently  steps-down its 6-28V DC input to standard PD output (5/9/12/15/3A, 20V/5A) and standard QC3 voltages (3.7-20V by 0.2V steps). On the other end of the cable is a PD trigger ("decoy") board that allows you to choose any standard PD voltage to output to its terminal block (there are similar triggers for QC3/2 Quick Charge).

Simply wire your laptop's DC barrel plug to the terminal block then set the trigger to 20V and you can power it up to 100W. The trigger can be configured to retain the voltage setting even when power is off, so it is effectively the same as having a 20V/100W power bank (but more efficient than most banks - likely over 95% according to chipset claims) . Note that 5A PD output requires a PD cable with emarker - as in the photo. Of course you can also use it as a universal power bank: as above, use the trigger to set voltages for older devices whose inputs are non-PD/QC, and remove the trigger for devices with PD/QC input.

The WITRN DC 2 PD is about $22 for two units (Aliexpress or eBay) and the YZXStudio ZY12PDN trigger/decoy is a few dollars e.g. on AliExpress. The DC to PD converters are also available in buck+boost versions (but likely less efficient). They are based on the iSmartware/Zhirong SW3518S and closely related chips (often used in "PD car chargers"). The best quality versions are made by YZXStudio, but there are numerous clones of varying quality.

Combine the above with a 6S (22.2V)  Li-ion pack and you get a powerful and efficient universal 100W powerbank.

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