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AC Wiring and feedback on camper build
#1
Hello,

I am building a setup for my camper van and need some advice.  I attached a picture of my creation so far it's still working progress still have some wiring to do. The negative connection coming in the post I needed a 10mm one and the cable will be shorter and still need to wire in the Victron Cerbo GX.

I am no PRO just some chap google and reading post on how to's. I have a 7s 18650 pack 120p.  

On the AC end, I need some guidance on what breaker I should use and the correct way to wire it.  I have a 16amp breaker I'm going to swap this to 32amp I'm on 220v my induction cooktop on full pulls 3000w at 220v.

I have added a picture of the inverter AC and the breaker whats the correct way to wire this?

Thanks 



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#2
It's a 3-phase breaker, not really the right one to use... (dont use it)

Basically, electrially, the earth terminal on any system should never be disconnected by a circuit breaker. Neutral in some cases as well, however with an inverter it is a bit more complex and what you do later could have implications as to what you do now.

You should be looking for a single pole breaker.

The three terminals on the inverter are (from the top and assuming the colours are correct):
Neutral
Earth
Live

The lower (red) terminal is where you connect the breaker.

With AC which terminal of the breaker you use does not matter.
If you can't quantify how much they cost, it's a deal, I'll buy 5 of them for 3 lumps of rocking horse ......
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#3
An inverter like that will almost always have a floating neutral, you should be using a 2 pole circuit breaker. Ideally a residual voltage device breaker (RVD) as a normal GFDI or RCD breaker does not work properly with a floating neutral.

A normal house power point should test as 220v between active and neutral as well, 220v between active and earth and 0v between neutral and earth.

The inverter output will show 220v between active and neutral but about 110v between active and earth and 110v between neutral and earth, this can shift 20v either way depending on loads.

Because you do not have a true permanent earth on the camper you should not create a Main Earth Neutral link even if you inverter did support it, most smaller ones do not. Rather than pulling the neutral down to 0v this would actually pull the camper chassis UP to 110v, as well as you car when connected.

I would not go as high as 32A, I would stay with the 16A, 20A at most.

If you do wire the AC side yourself please have the setup inspected and tested by an electrician before going live, you could potentially harm or kill anyone that even touches the outside of the camper if the inverter is connected incorrectly.
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#4
Thanks for the feedback.

Can you recommend any breakers at 20 amps?
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#5
(07-12-2020, 08:57 PM)b0re Wrote: Thanks for the feedback.

Can you recommend any breakers at 20 amps?
Not sure of your location - but I think we're talking standard US 120v wiring.  There are 2 basic types of breakers - depends on the breaker box you buy.

Here's a HOM format (Square D) - https://www.amazon.com/Square-Schneider-Electric-HOM120CP-Single-Pole/dp/B000H5Y96E/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=20a+breaker&qid=1594593788&sr=8-1

Here's a QP format - https://www.amazon.com/Q120-20-Amp-Singl...83&sr=8-16
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#6
I am in the UK 220v
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#7
For safety with a floating neutral invreter in a camper you should be using an RVD breaker, such as: https://www.rvdsafe.com.au/

This will sense when something is wrong with either the active or neutral leg as well as a general overload circuit breaker.

You could use an RCBO: https://uk.rs-online.com/web/generalDisp...rcbo-guide

These use 2 poles and when switched off disconnect both active and neutral wires.

As you have a floating neutral do not count on the RCD component working if some puts anything they shouldn't in a power point.
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#8
(07-14-2020, 12:26 AM)BaronVonChickenPants Wrote: For safety with a floating neutral invreter in a camper you should be using an RVD breaker, such as: https://www.rvdsafe.com.au/

This will sense when something is wrong with either the active or neutral leg as well as a general overload circuit breaker.

You could use an RCBO: https://uk.rs-online.com/web/generalDisp...rcbo-guide

These use 2 poles and when switched off disconnect both active and neutral wires.

As you have a floating neutral do not count on the RCD component working if some puts anything they shouldn't in a power point.

Yes like that.  So the neutral is monitors for currently adding additional safety.

Thanks
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