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How much damage to a cell is too much?
#11
bad/loose connections are the source of many problems, low voltage, sticking solenoid.
Later floyd
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#12
(07-26-2020, 04:38 PM)floydR Wrote: bad/loose connections are the source of many problems, low voltage, sticking solenoid.
Later floyd

How could I make my solenoid not stick? I can't think of how to limit the amperage it is getting during the few ms of direct short. Probably thousands of amps. I can't really measure it either. I know the battery is rated for 750 continuous. It's a Ford truck starter solenoid.
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#13
Is it a new solenoid or used solenoid? might be that the solenoid is faulty.
can you shorten the time? if you can start at 5ms then work up till it welds good. slowly work your way up or down as needed.

Later floyd
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#14
(07-26-2020, 05:21 PM)floydR Wrote: Is it  a new solenoid or used solenoid? might be that the solenoid is faulty.
can you shorten the time? if you can start at 5ms then work up till it welds good. slowly work your way up or down as needed.

Later floyd
I think I have to have it at a low time because of the high amperage of the battery. It seems to weld very well when it actually turns on for the set amount of time, it just sticks sometimes. And it was a new solenoid I got on Amazon.
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#15
Unsure how to proceed maybe someone knows way to modulate the current? or knows why the solenoid is sticking.
Drain the battery until just above 12v?
what is the current voltage of the battery?

later floyd
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#16
(07-26-2020, 11:01 PM)floydR Wrote: Unsure how to proceed maybe someone knows  way to modulate  the current? or knows why the solenoid is sticking.
Drain the battery until just above 12v?
what is the current voltage of the battery?

later floyd
It's at 12.7V, that's possible I guess but how would I discharge it quickly? Maybe I could plug a 100 watt light bulb into an inverter on it.
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#17
12.7v should be fine. I believe. It has been a few years since I had a sticking solenoid sorry that is as much troubleshooting as i know.
#1: A series of rapid or successive clicks coming from the starter solenoid

It indicates a situation where the holding coil of the solenoid keeps holding back, mostly as a result of not enough current reaching the solenoid.
What GA of cable from the battery to the solenoid? does the Cable get hot? if so try using a heavier GA of cable.

later floyd
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#18
(07-27-2020, 01:36 AM)floydR Wrote: 12.7v should be fine. I believe. It has been a few years since I had a sticking solenoid  sorry that is as much troubleshooting as i know.
#1: A series of rapid or successive clicks coming from the starter solenoid

It indicates a situation where the holding coil of the solenoid keeps holding back, mostly as a result of not enough current reaching the solenoid.
What GA of cable from the battery to the solenoid?  does the Cable get hot? if so try using a heavier GA of cable.

later floyd
Oh, that's a good suggestion, I'll try some thicker wires for actuating the solenoid next time. I had a suspicion that my 24GA stranded ones weren't enough.
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#19
24 ga should be thick enough.
Do you have the solenoid mounted to the battery post? or battery post to battery cable to solenoid to one lead of the welder?
Is solenoid hot when it starts sticking ? might have to slow down on the number of welds per minute.

Is the solenoid rated for continuous duty?
later floyd
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#20
(07-26-2020, 05:40 AM)Russ Wrote: I started putting my first 18650 pack together today and my spot welding solution can be finnicky and stick on, burning a hole in the ends of my cells sometimes. However, only one cell seemed to actually be punctured as I could smell the fruity electrolyte, and I'm getting rid of that one. I'm going to test the voltage of all the cells again tomorrow and see if any dropped.

Sounds like you have a too powerful welder. You should lower its current if possible or use less exposure time.
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