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How much damage to a cell is too much?
#21
(07-26-2020, 02:31 PM)Russ Wrote:
(07-26-2020, 08:01 AM)daromer Wrote: No damage is allowed.
Hole=bin
Sent=bin

Why gamble. You are unsure you bin. You dont even ask.

Voltage is not an indicator of IF the cell survived.

Well, because my spot welder is not 100% consistent, I know this will always happen during welding an entire pack together, and I'll probably end up re-buying cells forever at this point. Even the cells I didn't damage can hardly be removed from the nickel without damaging them, it seems. 

I kind of just wanted to try this once and I don't plan on making a hobby out of it, so I avoided buying hundreds of dollars of specialized equipment.

I'm not really sure what to do now short of just quitting while I still can. For anyone who wants to help me debug my spot welder, it's basically a foot pedal controlling a 555 timer in a pulse-shortener configuration, connected to a SSR, connected to a truck solenoid, connected to a car battery. I tuned it to turn on for the right amount of time when I press the foot pedal, and when it works it works perfectly, but then maybe 10% of the time it just makes a big spark and the solenoid clicks 4 or more times instead of 2 like it's supposed to.

For what it's worth, I noticed that most of the time, I damaged the positive side of cells, which seems to be hollow. (I'd guess ~2mm of air underneath) Maybe it's more prone to making the spot welder act up. It also seems like not as much of an issue as damaging the negative side. Any suggestions on what to do now?


Even though it's expensive, this is why people use welders like the kWeld... I literally took the same route as you, but quickly realized that trying to save a little coin on the spot welder was only going to cost me more in time, material, and batteries due to inconsistent performance. 

Considering how much work and time it takes to prepare a battery for welding... I didn't want drop the ball on the final step.
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#22
(07-27-2020, 03:33 AM)floydR Wrote: 24 ga should be thick enough.
Do you have the solenoid mounted to the battery post? or battery post to battery cable to solenoid to one lead of the welder?
Is solenoid  hot when it starts sticking ? might have to slow down on the number of welds per minute.

Is the solenoid rated for continuous duty?
later floyd
Post > cable > solenoid > welding electrode (piece of copper bar)

I'll check on the temperature next time, although when I took it apart I should have noticed if it was hot. It's so hard to find time to work with it being so hot.
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#23
(07-27-2020, 04:09 PM)Crimp Daddy Wrote: Even though it's expensive, this is why people use welders like the kWeld... I literally took the same route as you, but quickly realized that trying to save a little coin on the spot welder was only going to cost me more in time, material, and batteries due to inconsistent performance. 

Considering how much work and time it takes to prepare a battery for welding... I didn't want drop the ball on the final step.

Exactly.
The right tool for the right job and you will have consistent predictable results.

KWeld for me works great!
Wolf
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