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18650 best soldering technique part2
#51
Hello.
1- Battery solder points are sanded.
2- Put the batteries in the fridge to cool. Not the freezer.
3. Keep the soldering iron at high temperature and solder quickly.
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#52
(11-01-2020, 10:32 AM)Meefa Wrote: Hello.
1- Battery solder points are sanded.
2- Put the batteries in the fridge to cool. Not the freezer.
3. Keep the soldering iron at high temperature and solder quickly.

No, do NOT sand the solder points. If you cannot get solder over the entire area, you open the cell up to rusting.

Putting cells in the fridge and then applying high heat will cause MORE thermal shock/stress. I would not recommend soldering cold cells
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#53
1. No. You dont sand the battery sides. It will corode over time if you havent soldered it all.
2. Its not needed to cool anything and cooling it will just require you to hold the soldering iron even longer time on the cell.

Just use a high wattage iron with large mass on the tip and you have no issues to solder and if it doesnt stick you have the wrong solder.. Use on with rosin core made for electronics and you are good to go.
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#54
I use a Scotch Brite rotary wheel on a Dremel tool to remove oxidation before soldering. Works great. Is quick and won't remove the plating.

..and although I hate to bring up the solder vs. spot weld discussion again, I hope everyone understands those tiny spot welds hit 2500° F which is never a good thing for a Li-on cells. Not so bad for the + end of cells but a cause for concern on the - end. Just sayin.....
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#55
(11-01-2020, 01:56 PM)DiggsUt Wrote: I use a Scotch Brite rotary wheel on a Dremel tool to remove oxidation before soldering. Works great. Is quick and won't remove the plating.
That method should be OK. Sanding or grinding also creates metal particles increasing the risk of a short.

(11-01-2020, 01:56 PM)DiggsUt Wrote: ..and although I hate to bring up the solder vs. spot weld discussion again, I hope everyone understands those tiny spot welds hit 2500° F which is never a good thing for a Li-on cells. Not so bad for the + end of cells but a cause for concern on the - end. Just sayin.....
I think the trick is the "thermal pulse" from soldering vs spot-welding is quite different:
- a spot weld might get to a higher temp but the volume of metal heated is small & the duration short so the overall temp rise of nearby cell parts is low.
- soldering takes longer & even though it's not as hot, imparts more heat overall I think.
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#56
Its basically about the total energy put into the cell and how it emerges in terms of temperature over time and placement.
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#57
(11-02-2020, 09:59 AM)Redpacket Wrote: That method should be OK. Sanding or grinding also creates metal particles increasing the risk of a short.

What scares the heck out of me is the little metal chips flying around from cutting off the remainder of the spot weld with flush-cut cutters. Not sure how to control those or find a better way to remove them.
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#58
(11-02-2020, 01:23 PM)DiggsUt Wrote:
(11-02-2020, 09:59 AM)Redpacket Wrote: That method should be OK. Sanding or grinding also creates metal particles increasing the risk of a short.

What scares the heck out of me is the little metal chips flying around from cutting off the remainder of the spot weld with flush-cut cutters. Not sure how to control those or find a better way to remove them.

Set up a small box that has some sheets of steel on the inside, then behind the steel have either full blown magnets or electric magnets. As the particles come off, most of them will get attracted to the plates. You could use old hard drive magnets as they are "very" strong neodymium magnets. Use thin steel as the thicker the steel, the less magnetic flux will be available to grab stray particles. Then when you want to clean the plates, just pop them off the magnets, or turn the electromagnet off, and the particles will fall.
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#59
Ahhh - Good ideas. I may take a small 2.5" laptop drive magnet (I have a ton of them) and stick it to the cutter itself and see if that helps on my next round of harvesting. It may slow down the process too much though. I'll experiment with magnetic solutions.
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