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Headway Cells and Compression Series Connections
#1
  

Context: this would be for stationary battery setup; shed, garage, etc.

A few things I'm trying to wrap my head around. Let's say you're using some of those snazzy Headway cells, mostly for the pre-fab bolt on terminals. You could whip up a copper plate (have cnc, will machine) and then use something like copper washers between plates along with a nice long threaded rod to smush it all together.

Aside from having to remove the whole threaded rod to get at any particular module of cells, this seems like a much simpler construction model than individual high gauge wires for series connections, but it's not something I've come across so far. Why would some of the pros/cons of doing this kind of setup otherwise be?

As for the plates in this design, you can see I've modeled in a theoretical "built in" fusewire, but I have no idea how to go about figuring out how small it would need to be to break at a desired amp load. What I've searched up so far has, tbh, got my head spinning a bit. How would you figure out what size that should be?
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#2
Looks like this is done in a commercial design on market: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5E30u-66VI

Although, not done with headway nor with fused plates.
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#3
Care would be needed to avoid shorts from the threaded bar.... would need nylon, etc bushes everywhere.
Keeping the design modular allows for easier working on each section like you mentioned.
Remember you need BMS balancer connections to each section too.
Cell fusing would not be visible in rod design?
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#4
It'll probably be very difficult to machine fuse integrated plates out if copper. Cu just conducts current and heat too well, so the fuse part would have to be really thin and/or long (needs to heat up enough to melt!), reducing mechanical strength.
Ideal material qualities for a fuse are: somewhat high electrical resistance, low thermal conductivity, low melting temperature. Pretty much the exact opposite of Cu.

Also, what happens when the fuse burns out? The cell would just dangle around, possibly droop and cause a short?
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#5
Yeah glass fuses (ie the ones with leads) might be better....
Running off solar, DIY & electronics fan :-)
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#6
(09-03-2020, 12:10 AM)Redpacket Wrote: Care would be needed to avoid shorts from the threaded bar.... would need nylon, etc bushes everywhere.
Remember you need BMS balancer connections to each section too.

I don't know why my brain did not connect the dots on "look, the rods are one big short". Talk about a dufus of a design setup.

(09-03-2020, 01:53 AM)ajw22 Wrote: Also, what happens when the fuse burns out? The cell would just dangle around, possibly droop and cause a short?

Yeah, good point. Some non-conductive inserts could be made to sit in the empty space to hold the cell after the fuse goes, but that's just more parts to make.

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Overall, way, way, waaaaaaaay too much work, hassle, and complexity. Was fun to imagineer though. Thanks for the feedback!
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