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Using a Volt as a emergency battery
#11
I'd think very hard before doing such modifications. Wouldn't be surprised if the BMS interpreted the surprise drop in voltage as a potentially catastrophic damage to the battery, and refused all further operations. And GMC technicians could rightly refuse to even look at such modified high voltage stuff.
Modular PowerShelf using 3D printed packs.  60kWh and growing.
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#12
(08-30-2020, 02:49 PM)idur Wrote: The Bolt has CCS quick charging, which is putting DC current directly from the charger into the battery. However, that way of charging is still controlled by the car's BMS. CCS currently does not allow 2 way current transfer, meaning you can only charge, not discharge. This is maybe coming in the future, but it certainly isn't built into the Bolt right now. I suspect that the BMS will disconnect the battery when you try to discharge.

Cars with ChaDeMo ports are known to be able to be discharged because it is a feature of the ChaDeMo standard. So you'd be looking at a Nissan Leaf or something like that.

Thanks. I had seen the contactor, but didn't consider that the bms would disconnect it if power was being drawn. The Volt looked just perfect for this use. hmm

(08-30-2020, 03:12 PM)ajw22 Wrote: I'd think very hard before doing such modifications. Wouldn't be surprised if the BMS interpreted the surprise drop in voltage as a potentially catastrophic damage to the battery, and refused all further operations. And GMC technicians could rightly refuse to even look at such modified high voltage stuff.

It wouldn't require any modifications. If it worked, the inverter would be connected via the charge port to the battery bus. Seems only a contactor lies between. The voltage shouldn't drop that dramatically, though after a while there should be some because of the power drawn. Think the bms controller is active all the time.

However, as Idur said the software side might do all sorts of crazy.
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#13
On top of the BMS issues, you may struggle to find an inverter that works in the 400v range.

I have used my Bolt as a backup power source. But, I used a 12v inverter. Sure it's less efficient to have the car convert from 400vdc to 14vdc then convert from 14vdc to AC, but it also didn't require modifying the car.
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#14
I've heard about 12V inverters too. With a LEAF you could use a 1kW inverter since that is the power for the DC-DC converter in the car.
You also have to keep a LEAF in the ready-to-drive mode so it keeps charging the 12V battery.
I don't know what the requirements are for something like that on the Bolt.

Depending on the emergency, it could work.
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#15
Thanks. I'm rather set on using an EV as a battery for the inverter at 400V. Not sure if the bolt won't, since the opinion is that it might not. There is a company that states that it can. https://dcbel.ossiaco.com/

Don't need the car to line inverter they make, but still seems that the idea might be doable
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#16
The company has a nice website. On the “Our technology” page, there is a link to a FAQ.

I'll quote from that document:
https://www.ossiaco.com/wp-content/uploa...Q-v1.1.pdf Wrote:What EVs are compatible with Blackout Power?
Blackout Power is the beloved dcbel™ feature that uses the energy stored in your EV’s massive battery to power your home in a utility grid blackout. This is otherwise known as bidrectional charging, two-way power flow, V2H (vehicle-to-home) or power discharge.
Compatibility with dcbel™’s Blackout Power feature requires a multi-part response:
1. Does the technical standard that the EV is built to allow for bidrectional power flow and communication?
There are two major global DC EV charging standards: CHAdeMO and CCS. All EVs built to the CHAdeMO standard like the Nissan Leaf and Mitsubishi Outlander are currently compatible with Blackout Power while, as a rule of thumb, pre-2021 CCS vehicles like the Chevrolet Bolt are not currently supported. The CCS standards are currently being revised to allow EV’s built to CCS standards to support bidrectional power flows. The revised standards are scheduled to be published this year (2020) and dcbel™ was designed to be ready for the CCS protocol update and will be able to support Blackout Power via CCS with a small over the air upgrade shortly after the updated protocol is published.

So they say they'll update their equipment when the standards for CCS get rewritten. They don't say anything about when CCS equipped cars like the Bolt will support two way charging.

Like I said, it may come to the Bolt in the future.

Edit: good find though, I am on the lookout for such equipment to use with my LEAF, but it isn't widely commercially available.
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#17
(09-01-2020, 09:53 PM)idur Wrote: So they say they'll update their equipment when the standards for CCS get rewritten. They don't say anything about when CCS equipped cars like the Bolt will support two way charging.

Like I said, it may come to the Bolt in the future.

Edit: good find though, I am on the lookout for such equipment to use with my LEAF, but it isn't widely commercially available.
Thanks Sad

So I guess I will need to wait a bit more. Hopefully, by then ev will be cheaper, and doing this will be easier. The bolt just sounded like nice car from the engineering point of view. I'm surprised gm did such a good job with it.

Usually don't accept negatives at face value, since things aren't always as black or white as they say. '21 are coming out soon, so will keep my fingers crossed


Quote:as a rule of thumb,pre-2021 CCS vehicleslike the Chevrolet Boltare notcurrently supported

However, seems my idea is right on the money. They basically are doing the same

Quote:What stationary batteries is dcbel™compatible with?dcbel™is compatible with all batteriesthat have a 400V DC nominal voltagelike the LG Chem RESU



Good luck getting one for your leaf.
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#18
(09-02-2020, 04:12 AM)baskinginthesun2000 Wrote: So I guess I will need to wait a bit more. Hopefully, by then ev will be cheaper, and doing this will be easier. The bolt just sounded like nice car from the engineering point of view. I'm surprised gm did such a good job with it.

Yes, the Bolt is a marvel of engineering. I hope GM enables two way charging on it as soon as feasable.

Maybe even retrofit it to older model years for a fee. It should only be a BMS software update.
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