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Plain breaker/fusing or Trip Shunt Breaker for Batrium...OR INSTEAD A CONTACTOR??
#1
Ok ...this is probably my bad on this, but I have to ask the question.  I did not buy the expansion board with my Batrium system.  My plan was to use some kind of marine type breaker or fusing for protection.  Now as I get into this I am getting the impression that the expansion board and a trip shunt type of breaker really is a necessity for the Batrium.  Is this true?   My first powerwall build is not that big.  The demand is going to be average 60 amps with peak bursts of 150 amps at times.  I am building a 48V/6.1kw powerwall.  Looks like getting the expansion board and a used trip shunt breaker for that type of demand is going to cost me another $200 or so.
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#2
You dont need the expansion board to trip breakers, which should be used in combination with fusing.

https://support.batrium.com/article/102-...it-breaker
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#3
Those diagrams then require a positive sense circuit breaker like the Schneider that Batrium is selling?  Or are they also relevant to something like the ABB shunt trip breakers?  And again you do not need the expansion board as you indicated?  I guess I should have actually asked ...what is the most basic/cost effective way  for those of us just getting into the Batrium system for safety/protection?
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#4
All that's required to trip a breaker (breaking either DC or AC, or both) is a pulse from either the A or B output, or both - the tripped indication is optional, so any suitable breaker can be used provided its coil is rated for the full voltage range of your battery.

This topic has been detailed on this forum numerous times previously.
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#5
OK, thank you Sean.  Sorry for bringing up an old topic, I will search for the older threads so I can understand this better.
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#6
(06-06-2019, 01:47 PM)Headrc Wrote: OK, thank you Sean.  Sorry for bringing up an old topic, I will search for the older threads so I can understand this better.

I recall replying to very similar questions within the last Month, but they'll likely be to threads not specifically related, but still within this BMS section.

There's also quite a few posts related on the FB group which should help you.
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#7
(06-06-2019, 04:16 PM)Sean Wrote:
(06-06-2019, 01:47 PM)Headrc Wrote: OK, thank you Sean.  Sorry for bringing up an old topic, I will search for the older threads so I can understand this better.

I recall replying to very similar questions within the last Month, but they'll likely be to threads not specifically related, but still within this BMS section.

There's also quite a few posts related on the FB group which should help you.

Thanks again ....sorry to say Facebook and I don't get along very well though.  Smile
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#8
Ditto, I find a self imposed 10 minutes usage allowance helps.
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#9


I think I understand this Batrium diagram for just using the mosfets on the Watchmon 4 to control a negative sense shunt trip breaker but could someone correct me if I am wrong.   

With a 48V battery integrated with a shunt trip breaker that requires 48 volt supply for the shunt trip: 


1.  The positive of the battery connects to the positive supply voltage of the Watchmon4 with a 2A fuse in line and also connects to the positive side of the trip on the breaker with a 4A fuse in line.
2. The negative side of the battery connects to the negative ground of the Watchmon 4 and to one side of the negative sense of the trip shunt breaker
3. The other lead from the sense on the trip shunt breaker connects to the input A on the Watchmon 4.
4.  The output A on the Watchmon 4 connects to the negative side of the trip on the trip shunt breaker.
5.  The load (inverter) is connected through the shunt trip just like any regular breaker 

Is this all correct?  Is the power for the shunt trip breaker being supplied by that connection of the positive side of the battery and the output A of the Watchmon 4? 

Then as I understand it if I was to use a shunt trip breaker that required 24V to power it then there would be a resister in line on the positive side of the battery before it connects to the trip side of the breaker.  Is this also correct?

Then the software must be set up to determine what causes the breaker to be tripped?

And lastly, if all of what I have stated here is correct ...where does the load connect to the breaker?  

Thanks as always.
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#10
Anyone have some input on my recent post here?
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