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What do you think about this?
#1
Hi guys i just want to ask for your opinion about this. I'm not comfortable with my battery pack 7S12P exposed(these are harvested cells from laptop batteries) i don't want them flying around when there will be failure. So i had an idea Cool  and made a case from an old computer Powersupply it fits 7S6P so i made 2packs. The first pack have a BMS and the 2nd pack doesn't have BMS. Also i will be checking every month if the cells are balanced,after using the 7S12P for nearly 2months the cells never go unbalanced so thats a good thing lol. I use this battery pack for Solar Storage, the load of the pack at night is only 32w @1.2A max, giving light to my house 16w(outdoor)8w(my room)8w(kitchen) and runs 6pm to 7am, it runs perfectly.  so my question is in the long run, is there gonna be a problem with my current setup? assuming the answer in my first question is there is no problem in the long run. If i need to add a load say 20w to run a light bulb for 5hours and i need more stored power will adding another 7S6P advisable making it 3 separate packs?



Cell fused @ 1.5A since they are low drain cells
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#2
Looks really cool, especially the stickers! Creative! I'm assuming you have some insulator between the packs and the metal case? Otherwise you would surely have a short by now.
Formerly known as Dallski
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#3
(03-21-2019, 03:32 PM)Dallski Wrote: Looks really cool, especially the stickers! Creative! I'm assuming you have some insulator between the packs and the metal case? Otherwise you would surely have a short by now.

thanks. Yes i cut some plastic folder as insulator and glued around the metal case inside all sides except the small holes at the back for cooling.
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#4
Nice setup for paralleling those packs. Just remember, tho, you can't pull a whole lotta amps through those wires. Unless those are specifically for balancing and the Pos/Neg ends of the pack are in a different location.

But neat idea using those spade connector bars like that.
Proceed with caution. Knowledge is Power! Literally! Cool 
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#5
What ist the reason of having both poles of each battery fused? I do bar connect for the neg poles and fuse the positive only.
1 kWp in Test
4 kWh battery target - plus Mobile Home battery
Ultra low cost
Electronics ? No clue. Am machinery engineer.
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#6
+1 looks nice :-)
Clever use of old PC PSU cases!
With the small loads you have now, wire sizes should be no issue.
If you do grow the capacity & loads you might want to consider making the 0V & +ve outputs from the battery packs thicker wire.
(I think I can see a thicker +ve wire?)
You might also want to take the +ve from one side of the packs & the -ve from the opposite side pack to even out current flow.
Running off solar, DIY & electronics fan :-)
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#7
For optimization of the efficiency and reliability of the solar system, a relatively new method is used to connect to the each solar panels on the micro inverter for each solar panel is equipped with a separate miniature inverter system can adapt to the changing load and weather conditions, so that they can for a single piece of panel and the entire system to provide the best conversion efficiency.

The micro-inverter architecture also simplifies wiring, which means lower installation costs. By making consumers' solar systems more efficient, systems can "recoup" the initial investment in solar technology in less time.
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#8
(04-01-2019, 07:32 AM)Alber Wrote: For optimization of the efficiency and reliability of the solar system, a relatively new method is used to connect to the each solar panels on the micro inverter for each solar panel is equipped with a separate miniature inverter system can adapt to the changing load and weather conditions, so that they can for a single piece of panel and the entire system to provide the best conversion efficiency.

The micro-inverter architecture also simplifies wiring, which means lower installation costs. By making consumers' solar systems more efficient, systems can "recoup" the initial investment in solar technology in less time.

Micro inverters have been around for over a decade, nothing new there.

Their long term reliability is highly questionable - complex electronics being heat cycled numerous times a day is very fair from ideal.
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#9
(04-01-2019, 07:32 AM)Alber Wrote: For optimization of the efficiency and reliability of the solar system, a relatively new method is used to connect to the each solar panels on the micro inverter for each solar panel is equipped with a separate miniature inverter system can adapt to the changing load and weather conditions, so that they can for a single piece of panel and the entire system to provide the best conversion efficiency.

The micro-inverter architecture also simplifies wiring, which means lower installation costs. By making consumers' solar systems more efficient, systems can "recoup" the initial investment in solar technology in less time.

Efficiency in shaded panels can be improved sometimes with micro inverters.
However, over-all efficiency of a micro inverter system with batteries is significantly reduced because it is AC coupled ie AC > DC conversion losses.
DC > DC systems are typically more efficient overall.
Running off solar, DIY & electronics fan :-)
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#10
(04-01-2019, 08:10 AM)Sean Wrote:
(04-01-2019, 07:32 AM)Alber Wrote: For optimization of the efficiency and reliability of the solar system, a relatively new method is used to connect to the each solar panels on the micro inverter for each solar panel is equipped with a separate miniature inverter system can adapt to the changing load and weather conditions, so that they can for a single piece of panel and the entire system to provide the best conversion efficiency.

The micro-inverter architecture also simplifies wiring, which means lower installation costs. By making consumers' solar systems more efficient, systems can "recoup" the initial investment in solar technology in less time.

Micro inverters have been around for over a decade, nothing new there.

Their long term reliability is highly questionable - complex electronics being heat cycled numerous times a day is very fair from ideal.

Especially with respect to the pure tin soldering according to ROHS compatibility.
It has a reason why military and health care electronics are excluded from ROHS tin rules.....
1 kWp in Test
4 kWh battery target - plus Mobile Home battery
Ultra low cost
Electronics ? No clue. Am machinery engineer.
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